Origin of the Mohawk

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“You shall not round the corners of your heads, neither shall you mar the corners of your beard.” Leviticus 19:27

“They shall not make baldness upon their head, neither shall they shave off the corner of their beard, nor make any cuttings in their flesh.” Leviticus 21:5

This did not mean that the sons of Israel must never cut their hair or trim their beards. What they are told is to refrain from participating in the ritual mourning and worship practices of the pagans. It was a ritual custom of the heathen to cut or trim their beards or hair into special shapes in honour of a particular pagan deity (the ‘mohawk’ or the ‘mohican’ is one such shape).

Pawnee Indian, circa 1880s

Pawnee Indian with mohawk, circa 1880s

Kenyan Mukamba, circa 1920s

Kenyan Mukamba with mohawk, circa 1920s

Samoan hairstyle with tribal designs

Samoan hairstyle with tribal designs

 Young boy from Bacaja Village, Amazon, Brazil

Kayapo girl from Xikrin tribe in Bacaja Village, Amazon, Brazil

To honour the sun god Ra, the ancient Egyptians had their dark hair cut short or shaved with great care with a round bald spot also shaved on the top of the head, so the hair that remained on the crown appeared in the form of a circle surrounding the head (a halo), known as the tonsure. The beard was dressed in a square form.

The tonsure is also practised by Catholic monks as the ‘clerical tonsure’ during ordination, as the visible inauguration of those who submit to it as the priests of Bacchus (Roman god of Wine and Debauchery), as a sign of religious devotion or humility. The term originates from the Latin word tōnsūra (meaning ‘clipping’ or ‘shearing’. Tonsure also refers to the secular practice of shaving all or part of the scalp to show support or sympathy, or to designate mourning.

The tonsure is the first part of the ceremony of priestly ordination in Catholicism, and it is held to be a most important element in connection with the orders of the Roman clergy.

Clerical tonsure

Clerical tonsure

It is also commonly used in the Eastern Orthodox Church for newly baptised members and is frequently used for Buddhist novices and monks. It exists as a traditional practice in Islam after completion of the hajj and is also practiced by a number of Hindu religious orders.

Another distinguishing mark of the priests of Nimrod, later known in the Old Testament as Priests of Baal, was the ‘clerical tonsure’, an initiation rite in which the priest of Nimrod has the top of his head sheared bald, while the edges of the hair allowed to remain as a ring, in honour of Nimrod who was also worshipped as the sun god. — The Two Babylons by Alexander Hislop, p222.

The pageboy cut is done by 'rounding off the corners of the head' in honour of the sun god

The pageboy cut is done by ’rounding off the corners of the head’ in honour of the sun god

Among the ancients, the hair was often used in divination. The worshippers of the stars and planets cut their hair evenly around, trimming the extremities.

Hamar girl from Ethiopia

Hamar girl from Ethiopia

Those that worshipped the hosts of heaven, in honour of them, cut their hair so that their heads might resemble the celestial globe — the Neo-Nazis, or Skinheads, of Europe shave their heads in this manner, and also sport mohawks.

Neo-Nazis or Skinheads

Neo-Nazis or Skinheads

Kikuyu women at Karatina Market in Nyeri, Kenya, 1936

Kikuyu women with shaved heads at Karatina Market in Nyeri, Kenya, 1936

Arbore girl with shaved head, Ethiopia

Arbore girl with shaved head, Ethiopia

The Arabs and Macians of Northern Africa (the country of Maka was the headland on the Arabian side of the Strait of Hormuz) were accustomed to shave the hair around the head, and left a tuft standing up on the crown in honour of Bacchus — this custom is also present in Asia, Africa and Europe; the Chinese shave the front of the head and let the tuft grow until it is long enough to be plaited into a tail.

Manchu Queue

Queue or cue worn traditionally by the Manchu people of Manchuria, and certain indigenous American tribes. With the Manchu’s conquest of China, Chinese men were mandated to submit to the hairstyle in order to demonstrate political fidelity to the Manchu; those that did not have the hairstyle were charged with treason and faced the death penalty. The Queue Order or tonsure decree, was a series of laws violently imposed by the Qing (Manchu) dynasty in the 17th century. It was also imposed on Taiwanese aborigines in 1753, and Koreans who settled in northeast China in the late 19th century

 Japanese man with chonmage, which features a shaved pate. The remaining hair was oiled and tied into a small queue which was folded onto the top of the head in the characteristic topknot

Japanese man with chonmage, which features a shaved pate. The remaining hair was oiled and tied into a small queue which was folded onto the top of the head in the characteristic topknot

Kenyan Turkana girl with plaited tuft

Kenyan Turkana girl with plaited tuft on the crown

Young Girl at Gyi Dawma Village, Myanmar

Young girl with tuft at Gyi Dawma Village, Myanmar

Ukranian man with cossak chupryna

Ukranian man with a Cossak chupryna

Sarmatian warrior

Sarmatian warrior with tuft on crown

In Hinduism, the underlying concept is that hair is a symbolic offering to the gods, representing a real sacrifice of beauty. In return, the offerers are given blessings in proportion to their sacrifice. In some traditions, the hair is shaved completely and only a small tuft of hair, called sikha, is left.

Sikha

Sikha

These hairstyles, considered trendy and popularised by celebrities, are rooted in paganism and occult practices; and associated with the gods they were traditionally designed to honour (see A Sacrifice of Beauty, The Great Deception, Pagan gods and Pagan feasts).

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3 responses »

  1. Amazing article.God bless you as you continue to show people the truth. It would be very helpful if you post an article on THE SABBATH DAY as well. Great job.

    Like

  2. I had always imagined that verse was specifically about Mohawks, and not only was that correct but I see now just how DEEPLY rooted in paganism it is! So glad to have found this! What a blessing!

    Like

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