Monthly Archives: May 2014

Mickey Mouse

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Mickey Mouse is used to symbolise Monarch slaves who are spies (see Monarch slaves). These Monarch slaves are demonically possessed and the demons become their alter personas that control every aspect of their lives.

The mascot/identifier of spies is Mickey Mouse ears.

Mickey Mouse

Mickey Mouse

Ears are for hearing/listening and these ears symbolise spying.

When these slaves give private performances or are hired out as sex slaves to wealthy sheikhs, local or foreign businessmen/politicians, clergy or royals, they act like tape recorders and record everything they hear, then playback/repeat it to their handlers.

Let’s take a look at where Mickey Mouse ears appear:

Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson

Rihanna

Rihanna

Candice Swanepoel; note the ‘x’ on her glove and those on the eyeballs of the creature staring at her. An ‘x’ is a diagonal cross

Ashley Tisdale

Ashley Tisdale, who is symbolising the ‘Eye of Ra’ (see All-Seeing Eye)

Katy Perry and Hayden Panettiere

Katy Perry and Hayden Panettiere

Beyonce

Beyoncé

Britney Spears

Britney Spears on the cover for the single I Wanna Go; note the skull with the Mickey Mouse ears, symbolising a demon-possessed Britney. The skull represents a skeleton

Etymology of skeleton:

From Ancient Greek σκελετός ‎(skeletós, meaning ‘dried up, withered, dried body, parched, mummy‘), from σκελλώ ‎(skellṓ, meaning ‘dry, dry up, make dry, parch’), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)kelh₁- ‎(to parch, wither); compare Greek σκληρός ‘hard’.

The skeleton represents the demons that possess Britney — demons are dead, zombies, dried up like a mummy.

Cubby O'Brien as a Mousketeer on The Mickey Mouse Club, circa 1956

Cubby O’Brien as a Mousketeer on The Mickey Mouse Club, circa 1956

Tina Fey, photographed for Vogue magazine

Kourtney Kardashian, the cat she is holding identifies her as a sex slave

Annette Funicello and Jimmie Dodd

Annette Funicello and Jimmie Dodd

Chloe Grace Moretz in Teen Vogue magazine

Chloe Grace Moretz in Teen Vogue magazine; Chloe is wearing chains, symbolic of her enslavement

Madonna

Madonna

Dakota Fanning on the cover of Glamour magazine in March 2013

Lady Gaga

Lady Gaga

Xiao Wen Ju Vogue China January 2015

Xiao Wen Ju, photographed for Vogue China in January 2015

Jessie J

Jessie J

Suri Cruise

Suri Cruise

Bella Thorne

Bella Thorne; the leopard print pattern identifies her as a sex slave

Carly Rae Jepsen

Carly Rae Jepsen

Brendan Mayer

Brendan Mayer

Robbie Snelders, photographed for V magazine in 1999

Sarah Jessica Parker

Chrissie Chau on the cover of Ketchup magazine

Kelly Osbourne, Ali Lohan and Lindsay Lohan

Kelly Osbourne, Ali Lohan and Lindsay Lohan

Naomi Campbell

Naomi Campbell

Teri Hatcher and her daughter Emerson

Teri Hatcher and her daughter Emerson

Vanessa Hudgens

Vanessa Hudgens

 Jim Parsons

Jim Parsons

Twiggy

Twiggy

Tyra Banks, the leopard print hat symbolises Sex Kitten programming

Tyra Banks, the leopard print hat identifies her as a sex slave

Rita Ora on the cover of Elle magazine

Rita Ora on the cover of Elle magazine

Cher Lloyd

Cher Lloyd

Doda (real name Dorota Rabczewska)

Doda (real name Dorota Rabczewska)

Heather Marks by David Burton for Elle France December 2011

Heather Marks, photographed by David Burton for Elle France in December 2011

Drew Barrymore photographed for Pop magazine in September 2009

Drew Barrymore photographed for Pop magazine in September 2009

Chanel Iman Vogue Germany

Chanel Iman, photographed for Vogue Germany

Sting, photographed by Marcia Resnick in 1979

Zelda Williams, photographed for Entertainment Weekly

Zelda Williams, photographed for Entertainment Weekly; she is symbolising the ‘Eye of Horus’ (see All-Seeing Eye)

Emma Watson

Emma Watson

Coco Rocha by Arthur Elgort

Coco Rocha, photographed by Arthur Elgort. An ice cream cone represents the mental brain freeze of the Monarch slave, or their madness and helplessness

Melanie Brown and her daughter Madison

Melanie Brown and her daughter Madison

Karen Elson by Cass Bird for Vogue Korea October 2013 5

Karen Elson, photographed by Cass Bird for Vogue Korea in October 2013

Michael C. Hall

Michael C. Hall

Marilyn Manson Paper magazine

Marilyn Manson on the cover of Paper magazine

Jethro Cave

Jethro Cave

Ahn So-hee in Nylon Magazine

Ahn So-hee, photographed for Nylon magazine

Robin Williams

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Clones and Zombies

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“As it was in the days of Noah, so shall it be at the coming of the Son of Man.” Matthew 24:37

Is it really possible to clone humans and animals?

The answer is… Yes. Not only can it be done, it has been done and is still been done. The technology has not just been ‘discovered’, it has always been available, and came from knowledge stolen from heaven and taught to mankind by the fallen angels in antediluvian times (see Transhumanism and Cyborgism and Welcome to Oblivion).

Clones were present in the pre-flood world, as were all sorts of hybrids. The evil in this world mirrors that of the first one, which was destroyed by the flood.

Since clones do not have spirits and souls, which can only be created by Almighty Yahweh, they are able to achieve locomotion through the performing of Satanic rituals to invoke evil spirits/demons to possess them. This is true for both animal and human clones.

Also, clones HAVE NO BLOOD. Blood cannot be cloned or manufactured, and without it, man cannot live (see Your Blood, Your Life).

(Many invertebrate animals such as coral, jelly fish and flat worms do not have blood because they are able to absorb nutrients and move gases and wastes directly to the outside of their bodies.)

The hidden purpose for cloning is to provide ‘meat suits’ for these evil beings, so that they are able to walk the earth and experience the joys of eating, drinking and copulating, which they cannot do since their spirits were condemned to roam the earth after their death (a judgement against their fathers the Watchers/fallen angels for their rebellion in leaving heaven and corrupting life on earth) before the pre-flood world was washed away (see Aliens are Demons!). However, these cloned bodies deteriorate quickly, as they are unnatural.

What is cloning?

The term cloning describes a number of different processes that can be used to produce genetically identical copies of a biological entity through nonsexual means. The copied material, which has the same genetic makeup as the original, is referred to as a clone.

There are three different types of artificial cloning:

Gene cloning, which produces copies of genes or segments of DNA.
Reproductive cloning, which produces copies of whole animals.
Therapeutic cloning, which produces embryonic stem cells for experiments aimed at creating tissues to replace injured or diseased tissues.
(Cloning also occurs naturally. Certain plants and single-cell organisms, such as bacteria, produce genetically identical offspring through a process known as asexual reproduction, whereby a new individual is generated from a copy of a single cell from the parent organism.
Identical twins, which occur in humans and other mammals, are also natural clones. They are produced when a fertilised egg splits, creating two embryos that carry almost identical DNA. Identical twins have almost the same genetic makeup as each other, but are genetically different from each parent.)

One method of producing clones is Additive Manufacturing or 3D Printing, a process which, although claimed to have been around since the 1980s, has been available for centuries.

It involves making a three-dimensional solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. 3D Printing is achieved using an additive process, where successive layers of material are laid down in different shapes.

This technology is currently being used to secretly clone humans and animals, but, as usual, we are being fed its progress in small doses.

Here’s a related article:

The emerging process of 3-D printing, which uses computer-created digital models to create real world objects, has produced everything from toys to jewellery to food.

Soon, however, 3-D printers may be spitting out something far more complex, and controversial: Human organs.

For years now, medical researchers have been producing human cells in laboratories by hand to create blood vessels, urine tubes, skin tissues and other living body parts. But engineering full organs, with their complicated cell structures, is much more difficult.

Enter 3-D printers, which, because of their precise process, can produce the vascular systems required to make organs viable. Scientists are already using the machines to print tiny strips of organ tissue. And while printing whole human organs for surgical transplants is still years away, the technology is rapidly developing.

“The mechanical process isn’t all that complicated. The tricky part is the materials, which are biological in nature,” said Mike Titsch, editor-in-chief of 3D Printer World, which covers the industry. “It isn’t like 3-D printing plastic or metal. Plastic doesn’t die if you leave it sitting on an open-air shelf at room temperature for too long.”

The idea of printing a human kidney or liver in a lab may seem incomprehensible, even creepy. But to many scientists in the field, bioprinting holds great promise.

Bioprinting works like this: Scientists harvest human cells from biopsies or stem cells, then allow them to multiply on a petri dish. The resulting mixture, a sort of biological ink, is fed into a 3-D printer, which is programmed to arrange different cell types, along with other materials, into a precise three-dimensional shape. Doctors hope that when placed in the body, these 3-D printed cells will integrate with existing tissues.
Not everyone is comfortable with this bold new future of lab-built body parts, however.

A research director at Gartner Inc., the information-technology research and advisory firm, believes 3-D bioprinting is advancing so quickly it will spark a major ethical debate by 2016.

“Three-D bioprinting facilities with the ability to print human organs and tissue will advance far faster than general understanding and acceptance of the ramifications of this technology,” Peter Basiliere said in a recent report.

Bioprinting also creates complex ‘enhanced’ organs involving non-human cells, in a bid to develop transhumans.

3D printer to be used to print miniature organs

3D printer to be used to print miniature organs

A zombie is a corpse said to be revived by witchdoctors through witchcraft, esp. in certain African and Caribbean regions.

However, it is impossible for the body of any creature to achieve locomotion after death, and as soon as the human spirit leaves the body of flesh, the flesh begins to decompose and emanate a terrible stench.

A witch doctor is a witch who practices divination (communication with evil spirits), also known as a shaman or kahuna, and uses these demons to devise ways of ‘healing’ people. These witches invoke demons from hell to possess human beings.

 

 

 

 

 

Sinister Sites: At Your Service

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In a previous post, we discovered that the seven heads of the Beast that comes out of the sea (Revelation 13:1-2) are the seven rulers of seven European countries (see Pagan gods).

The ‘blasphemous names’ on these seven heads are the ancient and hidden names of continents, countries, cities and towns, which are named after pagan gods, goddesses and their offspring — Nephilim/demons.
In another post, we discussed how the title of Satan is used (see ‘Lord’ is a title for Satan).

Names and symbols of demons/pagan gods/goddesses are also used in establishments around the world, effectively turning these venues into temples dedicated to these deities (see Ganesha, the god of Nakumatt and Sun worship, Java, Nairobi).

Let’s take a look at some other examples:

Atlas: Greek god of War.

Atlas Hotel, Brussels, Belgium
Atlas City Hotel, Budapest, Hungary
Atlas Hotel, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Atlas Hotel, Alanya, Turkey
Atlas Bar, Manchester, England
Atlas Bar, Copenhagen, Denmark
Atlas Grill and Bar, Virginia Beach, Virginia, U.S.
Atlas Espresso Bar, Toronto, Canada
Atlas Pizza and Sports Bar, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Atlas Beer Café, Queenstown, New Zealand
Atlas Restaurant, St Louis, Missouri, U.S.

Apollo: Greek god of light and the sun, truth and prophecy, healing, plague, music, poetry and more.

Apollo Theatre, Shaftesbury Avenue, City of Westminster, London, England
Apollo Theatre, Newport, Isle of Wight, England
Apollo Theatre, Harlem, New York, New York. U.S.

Saturn: Roman god of agriculture, liberation and time.

Hotel Saturnia & International Venizia, Venice, Italy
Hotel Saturnia, Rome, Italy

Balthazar: A demon. The name is a variant of ‘Baltazar’, which means ‘Ba’al protect the king’ in Phoenician.

Balthazar Restaurant, 80 Spring Street, New York, New York, U.S.

Balthazar Restaurant, 80 Spring Street, New York, New York

Balthazar Restaurant, 80 Spring Street, New York, New York, U.S.

Balthazar, All-Day Brasserie Dining in Convent Garden, London, England
Balthazar Restaurant, SoHo, New York, New York, U.S.
Balthazar Hotel and Spa, MGallery Rennes, Rennes, France
Domus Balthasar Design Hotel, Prague, Czechoslovakia
Hotel Baltazár, Budapest, Hungary
Dar Balthazar Hotel, Marrakech, Morocco

Bacchus: The Roman god of wine and debauchery.

Bacchus, Brisbane, Australia
Bacchus Restaurant and Bar, New Paltz, New York, U.S.
Bacchus Wine Bar and Restaurant, Buffalo, New York, U.S.
Bacchus Restaurant and Lounge at Wedgewood Hotel and Spa, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Bacchus Lounge, Westlands, Nairobi, Kenya
The Bacchus Hotel, Sutton-on-Sea, Lincolnshire, England
Bacchus Tavern, Ancient Pisa (Miraka), Greece
Hotel Bacchus, Bensheim, Hesse, Germany

Belair: An occult name for Satan.

Hotel Bel-Air, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Bel Air Boutique, Paris, France
Belair Hotel, Blackwood, Australia

Belair Hotel, Blackwood, Australia

Belair Hotel, Blackwood, Australia

Belair Restaurant, Northwood, London, England
Bel Air Take Out Restaurant, Cap-Pele, Canada
Bel Air Bar + Grill, Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Hotel Bel Air, Paris, France

Isis: Egyptian goddess of motherhood, magic and fertility.

Isis Hotel and Spa, Gumbet, Turkey
Hotel Isis, Redington Beach, Florida, U.S.
Isis Hotel, Cairo, Egypt
Isis Bar and Lounge at Grange City Hotel, London
Isis Lounge, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Isis Bar Rock, Sao Paulo, Spain
Isis Restaurant and Music Hall, Asheville, North Carolina, U.S.

Horus: Egyptian god of war and hunting.

Horus House Hotel, Cairo, Egypt
Hotel Horus, Salamanca, Zamora, Spain
Hotel Horus, Felgueiras, Portugal
Horus Hotel, Aswan, Egypt
Hotel Horus Paradise Luxury Resort, Turkish Riviera, Turkey
Hotel Horus, Langon, France
Horus Café, East Village, New York, New York, U.S.
Horus Bar, Querétaro, Mexico

Tammuz: Babylonian, Assyrian and Sumerian god of fertility.

Tammuz Restaurant, Dundas, Canada

Ishtar: Assyrian and Babylonian goddess of fertility, love, war and sex.

Kempinski Hotel Ishtar, Dead Sea, Sowayma, Jordan
Cristal Grand Ishtar Hotel, Baghdad, Iraq

Cristal Grand Ishtar Hotel, Baghdad, Iraq

Cristal Grand Ishtar Hotel, Baghdad, Iraq

Ishtar Shisha Club, Warszawa, Poland
Ishtar Restaurant and Bar, North York, Ontario, Canada
Ishtar Café, Fairfax, Virginia, U.S.

Europa: The ‘mother of Europe’, Noah’s great-granddaughter, after whom the continent of Europe is named.

Europa Hotel, Belfast, Northern Ireland
Europa Gatwick Hotel, London, England
Europa Hotel, San Francisco, California, U.S.
Europa Hotel, Sliema, Malta
Europa Bar, Jamaica, New York, U.S.
Bar Europa, Seville, Spain
Europa Bar and Restaurant, Elizabeth, New Jersey, U.S.
Europa Lounge and Bistro, Palm Coast, Florida, U.S.
Europa Bar at Grand Hotel Europa, Innsbruck, Austria
The Turquoise Café Bar Europa, San Diego, U.S.

Lucifer: Before he was expelled from heaven, Satan was known as ‘Lucifer’ the Morning Star.

Lucifer Suite at The Saint Hotel, New Orleans, U.S.
Vinarte Vine and Lucifer Chocolate Shop, Bled, Slovenia
Lucifer Disko, Bangkok, Thailand
Lucifer (restaurant), Bangkok, Thailand                                                    Lucifers Pizza, Los Feliz, Los Angeles, California, U.S.

Satan: The devil.

Naked for Satan, Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia
Satan’s Whisker’s Cocktail Bar, Cambridge Heath Road, London, England
Bar Madame Satan, Sao Paulo, Spain
Satans Hollow, Manchester, England

Jesus: Pagan god of Christianity, worshipped as the Messiah and part of a trinity (see The Great Deception and Shroud of Turin).

Hotel Brom Jesus, Braga, Portugal
Hacienda Don Jesus, San Felipe, Mexico
Bon Jesus Hotel, Tecolutla, Mexico
Jesus Bar-B-Q and Mexican Food, Fairmount, Philadelphia, U.S.

Nimrod: Noah’s great-grandson, King of Babylon, worshipped as the sun god and Assyrian god Ninus (see Pagan feasts).

Nimrod Hotel, Mosonmagyarovar, Hungary
Nimrod Inn, Athelstane, Wisconsin, U.S.
Café Nimrod, Tel Aviv, Israel
Nimrod Resort Apartments, Port Douglas, Australia

Semiramis: Nimrod’s wife, Queen of Babylon, worshipped as a fertility goddess, the ‘queen of heaven’ and ‘mother of the gods’.

Semiramis Hotel, Marrakech, Morocco
Semiramis Hotel, Athens, Greece

Semiramis Hotel, Athens, Greece

Semiramis Hotel, Athens, Greece

Semiramis City Hotel, Rhodes, Greece
Semiramis Hotel, Cairo, Egypt

Venus: Roman goddess of love, beauty, fertility and prosperity.

Venus Hotel & Suites, Kalamaki, Greece
Venus Bed and Breakfast, Rhodes, Greece
Venus Beach Hotel, Cyprus
Venus Bar and Restaurant, Passaic, New Jersey, U.S.
Venus Sports Lounge, Orange County, California, U.S.
Venus Bar and Brasserie, Christchurch Road, Bournemouth, England

Hell: The place or state of punishment of the wicked after death; the abode of evil and condemned spirits, the place where the devil lives.

Hell’s Kitchen (restaurant), 679 Ninth Avenue, New York, New York, U.S.
Hell’s Gate National Park, Naivasha, Kenya

Hades: Another name for Hell.

Hotel Hades, Zdunska Wola, Poland
Hades Bar & Night Club, Santa Barbara, California, U.S.
Hades Bar, Timog, Quezon City, Philippines
Hades Bar & Grill, Katikati, New Zealand

Beelzebub: The chief devil; Satan (2 Kings 1:2).

Café Beelzebub, 353, Smith Street, Fitzroy, Melbourne, Australia

Phoenix: In occult symbolism, the fallen angel Samyaza is depicted as this bird or an eagle or peacock.

Phoenix Theatre, Blyth, Northumberland, England
Phoenix Theatre, Charing Cross Road, London, England
Phoenix Theatre, Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S.
Phoenix Theatre, Phoenix, Arizona, U.S.
Phoenix Players Theatre, Nairobi, Kenya
Phoenix Hotel, 601 Eddy Street, San Francisco, California, U.S.
Phoenix Hotel, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Phoenix Hotel, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Phoenix Hotel, Yogyakarta, Indonesia

Phoenix Bar, Brisbane, Australia
Phoenix Bar, New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.
The Phoenix, Cavendish Square, London, England
The Phoenix, Canberra, Australia
Phoenix Irish Bar, San Francisco, California, U.S.
Royal Phoenix Bar, Montréal, Canada
Phoenix Bar at the Exchange Hotel, Sydney, Australia
Phoenix Salon & Spa, Mount Laurel, New Jersey, U.S.
Spa Phoenix, Virginia Beach, Virginia, U.S.
Phoenix Spa & Salon, Blairsville, Pennsylvania, U.S.
The Phoenix Club, Anaheim, California, U.S.
Disco Phoenix Pecka, Pecka, Czechoslovakia

Astarte: Phoenician Moon goddess and Satan’s human wife in the pre-flood world.

Astarte Suites, Akrotiri, Greece
Astarte Fresh Yogurt Bar, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Faces of Astarte (salon and spa), Little Falls, New York, U.S.

Brigid/Brigit/Brigitte: Celtic goddess of Healing, Poetry and Smithcraft

Brigit Na Ladozhskoy, St. Petersburg, Russia
Hotel Brigitte, Ischgl, Austria
Restaurant Chez Brigitte á Paris, France
The Saint Brigid Hotel, Fatima, Portugal

Babylon: An ancient evil kingdom ruled by Nimrod and his queen Semiramis, who practiced witchcraft and deified themselves. Nimrod, against Yahweh Almighty’s command, prevented the immediate post-flood generation from spreading out and filling the earth by keeping them in one place as their leader and dictator (Genesis 10:8-12); ‘he was a mighty hunter before Yahweh’ means he was defiant against Yahweh and His laws.

Babylon Hotel, Benidorm, Spain
Hampshire Hotel-Babylon Den Haag, The Hague, Netherlands
Hotel Babaylon, Cesme, Turkey
Sianji Gardens of Babylon Well Being Resort, Bodrum, Turkey
Babylon The Bar, Illovo, Gauteng, South Africa
Beach Blanket Babylon, Notting Hill and Shoreditch, London, England
Babylon St Peters, Missouri, U.S.
Babylon Bar, Warren, Michigan, U.S.
Babylon Bar, Bordeaux, France

Babylon Bar, Bordeaux, France

Babylon Bar, Bordeaux, France

Babylon Bar, Rome, Italy
Babylon Futbol Café, Falls Church, Virginia, U.S.
Babylon Spa and Salon, Quezon City, Philippines
Babylon Spa and Sauna, Haymarket New South Wales, Australia
Babylon Nails & Spa, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.
Babylon Nails & Spa, Jacksonville, Florida, U.S.

Buddha: God of Buddhism, a Moonchild (reincarnate demon).

Buddha-Bar Hotel in Budapest, Hungary; Paris, France; Yerevan, Armenia; Prague, Czechoslovakia
Hotel Buddha, Varanasi, India
Hotel Buddha, Kathmandu, Nepal
Buddha-Bar, London, England
Buddha-Bar, Monte Carlo, Monaco

Java: A demon, son of Satan and his human wife Astarte in the pre-flood world

Java Restaurant, Randwick, Sydney, Australia
Java Coffee House, Nairobi, Kenya
Java Indonesian Rijsttafel, Brooklyn, New York City, U.S.
The Java Room Restaurant, Auckland, New Zealand
Island Lava Java Bistro, Kailua, Hawaii
Java Bar Espresso, Manchester, England
Java Village Restaurant, Sowerby Bridge, West Yorkshire, England
La Java Bistrot, Paris, France
Lava Java (restaurant), Meiningen, Germany
Java (nightclub), Bristol, Engalnd
Java Coffee and Tea Village Mall, Kampala, Uganda

Cronus/Cronos/Kronos: Greek god of Time and the Ages.

Kronos Hotel, Ankara, Turkey
Kronos Hotel, Crete, Greece
Kronos Bar, Rome, Italy
Kronos Gyros & Café, Lake Forest, Illinois, U.S.

Rhea: Greek goddess of Fertility and Motherhood.

Hotel Fortuna Rhea, Prague, Czech Republic
The Hotel Rhea, Arkansas, U.S.
Rhea Harbor Resort & Marina, Spring City, Tennessee, U.S.
Rhea’s Inn and Restaurant, Middletown, Rhode Island, U.S.
Rhea’s Café, San Francisco, California, U.S.

Mercury: Messenger of the gods, and the Roman god of Finance, Trade, Profit, Travellers, Gymnasts, Thieves, Merchants and Commerce.

Mercury Lounge, New York, New York, U.S.
Mercury Lounge, Nairobi, Kenya
Mercury Lounge, Ottawa, Canada
Mercury Lounge, Jumeira Road, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Mercury Lounge, Jumeira Road, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Mercury Lounge, Jumeira Road, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Mercury Lounge, Bath Lane, Glasgow, Scotland
Mercury Lounge, Tulsa, Oklahoma, U.S.
Mercury Lounge, Goleta, California, U.S.
Mercury Lounge, Nashville, Tennessee, U.S.
Mercury Bar, New York, New York, U.S.
Mercury Burger Bar, Detroit, Michigan, U.S.
Le Mercury, Upper Street, London, England
Le Mercury Deuxieme, Upper Street, London, England
Mercure Bristol Holland House Hotel and Spa, Redcliffe Hill, Bristol, England
Mercure Bristol Brigstow Hotel, Welsh Back, Bristol, England
Mercure Bristol North The Grange Hotel, Old Gloucester Road, Northwoods, Bristol, England
The Mercury Theatre, Colchester, Essex, England
The Mercury Mall, Romford, Greater London, England
The Mercury Hotel, Blackpool, England
Mercure Cardiff Holland House Hotel and Spa, Cardiff, Wales
Mercure Sheffield St Paul’s Hotel & Spa, Norfolk Street, Sheffield, England
Mercury Spa, San Diego, California, U.S.
Mercury Thai Spa, Benoni, Johannesburg, South Africa
Bluemercury Spa, Marlton, New Jersey, U.S.

Dažbog/Dazhbog/Dajbog/Dazhdbog/Dadzbóg: Slavic Sun god; Dažbog means ‘dispenser of fortune’.

Dazbog Coffee (a Russian-themed coffeehouse chain serving organic coffees alongside sandwiches and pastries), 16th Street Mall, Denver, Colorado, U.S.