Tag Archives: alice in wonderland

Alice in Wonderland

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Alice in Wonderland is used to symbolise Monarch slaves who are used as prostitutes or sex slaves for hire (see Monarch slaves and Beta Kittens).

Alice in Wonderland is named after Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, written by Charles Dodgson under the pseudonym Lewis Caroll. It is one of the most mystical and surreal works in literature, and is used as a reference book in the witchcraft performed to create Monarch slaves. ‘In wonderland’ refers to the permanent dissociative state in which Monarch slaves live.

The mascot/identifier of Alice in Wonderland is the rabbit and mirrors.

In the book, the White Rabbit represents Alice’s handler, and ‘going down the Rabbit Hole’ is a metaphor for ritual sodomy, which is used to open the pineal gland/spiritual doorway for demons to possess the Monarch slave. Theses demons control every aspect of the slave and become their alter personas.

Alice following the White Rabbit

Alice following the White Rabbit

Let’s take a look at how these slaves are presented:

Playboy magazine, used to advertise Beta Kittens. (Magazines are dual purposed. They serve as mindless materialism for the masses, and a Monarch slave craigslist for faceless Illuminists worldwide):

This is an American men’s magazine that features photographs of nude women. It was founded in Chicago in 1953 by Hugh Hefner and his associates. Playboy is one of the world’s best known brands, and in addition to the flagship magazine in the United States, special nation-specific versions of Playboy are published worldwide.

Pamela Anderson on the cover of Playboy magazine's January 2007 issue, the 11th time she has appeared on it (Pam has been on its cover 13 times)

Pamela Anderson on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January 2007 issue, the 11th time she appeared on it. Note the dollar $ sign on the crotch of her panties — a message to those in the know that Pam is available as a sex slave for a price

Playboy‘s iconic and enduring mascot is a stylised profile of a rabbit wearing a tuxedo bow tie, referred to as ‘Mr Playboy’. A running joke in the magazine involves hiding the logo somewhere in the cover art or photograph.

Playboy logo

Playboy logo

In an interview, Hefner explained his choice of a rabbit as Playboy’s logo to the Italian journalist Oriana Fallaci in Hugh Hefner: ‘I am in the center of the world,’ by Oriana Fallaci, LOOK magazine, January 10, 1967:

“The rabbit, the bunny, in America has a sexual meaning; and I chose it because it’s a fresh animal, shy, vivacious, jumping — sexy. First it smells you then it escapes, then it comes back, and you feel like caressing it, playing with it. A girl resembles a bunny. Joyful, joking. Consider the girl we made popular: the Playmate of the Month. She is never sophisticated, a girl you cannot really have. She is a young, healthy, simple girl — the girl next door… we are not interested in the mysterious, difficult woman, the femme fatale, who wears elegant underwear, with lace, and she is sad, and somehow mentally filthy. The Playboy girl has no lace, no underwear, she is naked, well-washed with soap and water, and she is happy.”

Some of these ‘Playmates’ are Monarch slaves:

 Linda Beatty on the cover of Playboy magazine's August 1976 issue

Linda Beatty as a Monarch butterfly on the cover of Playboy magazine’s August 1976 issue

White Rabbit as handler:

Cover for Playboy magazine's June 1967 issue

Sharon Kristie on the cover of Playboy magazine’s June 1967 issue, featuring the White Rabbit/handler keeping a watchful eye on the sex slave

Terry Ryan on the cover of Playboy magazine in December 1954

Judy Lee Tomerlin on the cover of Playboy magazine in June 1958

Beverly Kenney on the cover for the Beverly Kenney Sings for Playboys album

The White Rabbit/handler presenting his Sex Kittens on the cover of Playboy magazine's January 1973 issue

The White Rabbit/handler presenting his sex slaves (Deanna Baker, Lenna Sjooblom, Ellen Michaels, Linda Summers and Marilyn Cole) on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January 1973 issue

Nancy Jo Hopper on the cover of Playboy magazine in February 1964 — the White Rabbit is on her hand ~ handler

Margie Harrison on the cover of Playboy magazine’s June 1954 edition

Margie Harrison on the cover of Playboy magazine in January 1954 — two Margies symbolises duality/demonic possession

Then we have the Playboy Bunny, a waitress at the Playboy Club. The Playboy Clubs were originally open from 1960 to 1988. The Club re-opened a location The Palms Hotel in Las Vegas from 2006 to 2012.
Bunnies wore a costume called a ‘bunny suit’, inspired by the tuxedo-wearing Playboy rabbit mascot, consisting of a corset, bunny ears, a collar, cuffs and a fluffy cottontail.

Hefner and two Bunnies at the Playboy Mansion

Hefner and two Bunnies at the Playboy Mansion

The treatment of Playboy Bunnies was exposed in a piece written by Gloria Steinem and reprinted in her 1983 book Outrageous Acts and Everyday Rebellions. The article, published in 1963 in Show magazine as ‘A Bunny’s Tale’ (published in two parts, Part I and Part II.), detailed how women were treated at the Clubs — the exploitative working conditions of the Bunnies and the sexual demands made of them, which skirted the edge of the law.

Some of these ‘Bunnies’ are also slaves.

The Playboy Mansion is the home of Hefner in Los Angeles, California, where he likes to throw lavishly debauched parties/orgies, and where he lives with a number of women at a time. The mansion has 22 rooms, including a wine cellar, a game room, a zoo and aviary, a pet cemetery, tennis courts, a waterfall and a swimming pool area — including a patio and barbecue area, a grotto, a sauna, a bathhouse and a games house with two guestrooms equipped with only a bed, a ceiling mirror and a phone.
His image as a fast-living Lothario has done much to make success of the Playboy brand.

The Bunnies/Playmates/Sex slaves:

Paris Hilton

Paris Hilton

Kate Moss, photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott for Playboy magazine's January/February 2014 double issue, in honour of the magazine's 60th anniversary

Kate Moss, photographed by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott for Playboy magazine’s January/February 2014 double issue, in honour of the magazine’s 60th anniversary

Jenny McCarthy on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January 2005 issue; the leopard print identifies her as as a Beta Kitten/sex slave

Deanna Brooks, Playboy's Playmate of the Month in May 1998

Deanna Brooks, Playboy‘s Playmate of the Month in May 1998

Arnold Schwarzenegger - Playboy Magazine Cover [Japan] (January 2004)

Arnold Schwarzenegger on the cover of Playboy magazine [Japan] in January 2004

Darine Stern on the cover of Playboy magazine in October 1971

Jean Parker and Mary Carlisle circa 1930s

Donna Michelle on the cover of Playboy magazine’s May 1964 edition

Rihanna in her music video for the song S&M

Reese Witherspoon in Legally Blonde

Reese Witherspoon in the film Legally Blonde

Bo Derek on the cover of Playboy magazine in March 1980

Bo Derek on the cover of Playboy magazine in March 1980

Madonna at the 'Model as Muse: Embodying Fashion' Costume Institute Gala, held at The Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 4, 2009, in New York City

Madonna

Madonna Cosmopolitan Hungary magazine May 2015

Madonna on the cover of Cosmopolitan Hungary in May 2015

Nicki Minaj in the music video for Pills N Potions

Hugh Hefner's ex-girlfriend, Holly Madison

Holly Madison

Carmen Electra, who rose to fame on the pages of Playboy

Carmen Electra

Rachel McAdams in the film Mean Girls

Rachel McAdams in the film Mean Girls

Kelly Ripa

Kelly Ripa

Kathy MacDonald on the cover of Playboy magazine in March 1969

Sally Fields on the cover of Playboy's magazine March 1986 issue

Sally Field on the cover of Playboy magazine’s March 1986 issue; note the balloons

Kim Kardashian on the cover of Playboy magazine's December 2007 issue

Kim Kardashian on the cover of Playboy magazine’s December 2007 issue

Kendra Wilkinson on the cover of Playboy magazine's December 2010 issue

Kendra Wilkinson on the cover of Playboy magazine’s December 2010 issue

Padma Lakshmi Playboy France in July 2000

Padma Lakshmi on the cover of Playboy France in July 2000

Bruce Willis

Bruce Willis

La Toya Jackson on the cover of Playboy magazine's March 1989 issue

La Toya Jackson on the cover of Playboy magazine’s March 1989 issue; the diamond earring symbolises the demons that possess her. The star shape represents Satan ~ star is a metaphor for angel

Drew Barrymore on the cover of Playboy magazine's January 1995 issue

Drew Barrymore on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January 1995 issue. Drew has lifted up her T-shirt to reveal a butterfly tattoo below her navel, symbolising her demonic possession

 Dorothy Stratten on the cover of Playboy magazine's June 1980 issue; note the Monarch butterfly on her sleeve

Dorothy Stratten on the cover of Playboy magazine’s June 1980 issue; note the Monarch butterfly on her sleeve, symbolising her demonic possession

Dita Von Teese

Dita Von Teese

Tara Reid on the cover of Playboy magazine's January/February 2010 issue

Tara Reid on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January/February 2010 issue

Valerie Perrine on the cover of Playboy magazine's August 1981 issue

Valerie Perrine on the cover of Playboy magazine’s August 1981 issue

Anna Nicole Smith on the cover of Playboy magazine's February 2001 issue

Anna Nicole Smith on the cover of Playboy magazine’s February 2001 issue. Anna is wearing diamonds, symbolising the demons that possess her

Anna Nicole Smith

Shirley Temple

Shirley Temple

Levai Adrienn on the cover of Playboy Russia magazine's June 2011 issue

Levai Adrienn on the cover of Playboy Russia magazine’s June 2011 issue

Garcelle Beauvais on the cover of Playboy magazine's August 2007 issue

Garcelle Beauvais on the cover of Playboy magazine’s August 2007 issue

Nadya Ruchka on the cover of Playboy magazine Russia's October 2012 issue

Nadya Ruchka on the cover of Playboy Russia magazine’s October 2012 issue; the bracelets represent prison bars/enslavement

Kristi Cline, Tishara Cousino and the White Rabbit on the cover of Playboy magazine's February 2002 issue

Kristi Cline, Tishara Cousino and the White Rabbit on the cover of Playboy Japan magazine’s February 2002 issue

Lana Turner

Lana Turner

Poster for the reality series Girls Next Door, which focuses on the lives of Hefner's girlfriends who live with him at the Playboy Mansion

Kendra Wilkinson, Holly Madison and Bridget Marquardt on the poster for the reality series Girls Next Door, which focuses on the lives of Hefner’s girlfriends who live with him at the Playboy Mansion. Hefner is standing in the background, representing the handler or ‘unseen hands’ that manipulate Monarch slaves; he is wearing sunglasses to portray his deceptive nature

Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Rabbit, whose husband Roger Rabbit is her handler/abuser

Jessica Rabbit and Roger Rabbit in the 1988 animated film Who Framed Roger Rabbit?

Laura Richmond as Jessica Rabbit on the cover of Playboy magazine's November 1998 issue

Laura Richmond as Jessica Rabbit on the cover of Playboy magazine’s November 1998 issue. She is wearing a maroon dress; any shade of purple represents dissociation/madness. Her arms are forming the Masonic compass and square, and she is symbolising the ‘Eye of Horus’

Katy Perry as Jessica Rabbit

Katy Perry as Jessica Rabbit

Jessica Biel as Jessica Rabbit in a Saturday Night Live sketch

Jessica Biel as Jessica Rabbit in a Saturday Night Live sketch

Heidi Klum as Jessica Rabbit

Heidi Klum as Jessica Rabbit

Diana Dors as Jessica Rabbit

Sasha Pivovarova as Jessica Rabbit, photographed by Camilla Akrans

Sasha Pivovarova as Jessica Rabbit, photographed by Camilla Akrans

Viagra (Tatyana Kotova, Meseda Bagaudinova, Albina Dzhanabayeva), also known as Nu Virgos

Viagra (Tatyana Kotova, Meseda Bagaudinova, Albina Dzhanabayeva), also known as Nu Virgos

Goldie Hawn on the cover of Playboy magazine in 1985

Goldie Hawn on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January 1985 edition

Goldie is wearing red high heels. In The Wizard of Oz (1939), Dorothy’s ruby slippers are the keys to the unlocking of stargates. The ruby slippers represent the free will of Monarch slaves that is stolen from them after they become insane, which then enables the witches to ritually sodomise the slaves to facilitate the opening of the pineal gland/spiritual portal, and invoke demons to possess them.

 Joan Severance on the cover of Playboy magazine's November 1992 issue

Joan Severance on the cover of Playboy magazine’s November 1992 issue

Natalie Imbruglia for PETA; him represents her male alter/demons that possess her

Sam Faiers as Alice in Wonderland alongside the Mad Hatter and The Queen of Hearts (both represent demons), photographed for the July 2014 issue of HOT HOT magazine

Shannon Tweed Playboy January 1990

Shannon Tweed on the cover of Playboy magazine in January 1990

Khloé Kardashian

Ten-year-old Thylane Loubry Blondeau, photographed by Sharif Hamza for the December 2010/January 2011 issue of Vogue Paris. Cadeaux in French means ‘gift, present, treat’.  Note the chains on her shoes, symbolising enslavement

Lena Hardt, photographed by Emma Summerton for Grey magazine

Lena Hardt, photographed by Emma Summerton for Grey magazine

Joan Collins on the cover of Playboy magazine's December 1983 issue

Joan Collins on the cover of Playboy magazine’s December 1983 issue

Lily Cole Playboy France magazine's October 2008 edition

Lily Cole on the cover of Playboy France magazine’s October 2008 edition

Dolly Parton on the cover of Playboy magazine's October 1978 issue

Dolly Parton on the cover of Playboy magazine’s October 1978 issue

Nastassja Kinski on the cover of Playboy magazine's May 1983 issue

Nastassja Kinski on the cover of Playboy magazine’s May 1983 issue

Diana Lynn

Diana Lynn making the ‘Shhh… signal’, which is the hand sign for demonic possession, symbolising victims can’t speak/are spiritually bound/silent

Jessica Stam in a photoshoot from the April edition of Numéro China

Jessica Stam in a photoshoot from the April 2015 edition of Numéro China; the rabbit represents the handler/programmer.

Balloons symbolise the Monarch slave as a vessel or receptacle to receive the demons that possess them

Etymology of balloon:

(chemistry) A round vessel, usually with a short neck, to hold or receive whatever is distilled; a glass vessel of a spherical form.

Alcoholic beverages such as brandy, whisky, rum or arrack are called spirits and are obtained by distillation of wine — demons are spirits.

Kirstie Alley in A Bunny's Tale

Kirstie Alley in A Bunny’s Tale

Betty White

Betty White

Will Ferrell

Will Ferrell

Carol Willis on the cover of Playboy magazine's July 1970 issue

Carol Willis on the cover of Playboy magazine’s July 1970 issue. Carol is underwater. This is the Monarch slave’s experience — a constant feeling of being trapped underwater and unable to break free

LeAnn Rimes

LeAnn Rimes

Maki Onuki, photographed by Dean Alexander

Maki Onuki of The Washington Ballet, photographed by Dean Alexander

Lady Gaga on the cover of Neo2 magazine's September 2009 issue. Photo by Olivier Rauh

Lady Gaga on the cover of Neo2 magazine’s September 2009 issue

Alber Elbaz, photographed by Tim Walker in Paris 2009 (appeared in the New Yorker)

Alber Elbaz, photographed by Tim Walker in Paris 2009 (appeared in The New Yorker)

Steve Martin

Steve Martin

Cintia Dicker

Cintia Dicker

Christopher Walken

Christopher Walken

Binx Wilson by Sølve Sundsbø,

Binx Wilson, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø; the colour purple signifies dissociation/madness

Ondria Hardin, photographed by Karl Lagerfeld

Ondria Hardin

Ewan McGregor, photographed by Alexi Lubomirski

Ewan McGregor, photographed by Alexi Lubomirski

Anna Faris on The House Bunny poster

Anna Faris on The House Bunny poster

Michèle Morgan in 1951

Michèle Morgan in 1951

Jon Hamm

Jon Hamm

Susan Hayward

Susan Hayward

Megan Fox

Megan Fox

Paloma Faith

Paloma Faith

Natalia Vodianova on the cover of Tatler magazine in May 2011

Natalia Vodianova on the cover of Tatler magazine in May 2011

Janis Hansen

Janis Hansen

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs

Miley Cyrus leaving ABC studios after Jimmy Kimmel Live in Los Angeles, U.S., in August 2015

Miley Cyrus leaving ABC studios after Jimmy Kimmel Live! in Los Angeles, U.S., in August 2015

Audrey Kitching

Audrey Kitching; the pink hair identifies her as a prostitute/Pink Panther, the pink and black hair symbolises duality (see Pink Panther and Duality/Black Mass)

Elsa Peretti, photographed by Helmut Newton

Elsa Peretti, photographed by Helmut Newton; note the cigarette

Zooey Deschanel

Zooey Deschanel

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley

Rosie Huntington-Whiteley

Emma Watson

Emma Watson

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Beyoncé; note the clock

The clock alludes to the White Rabbit/handler who keeps checking time (demons travel through time and space from their spiritual realm to get to our physical realm) and who led Alice down the rabbit hole (ritual sodomy) into Wonderland/dissociation (demonic possession):

Alice in Wonderland White Rabbit

Blue Ivy Carter

Blue Ivy Carter (Beyoncé’s daughter); the white rabbit represents her handler

Rita Ora

Rita Ora

George Reeves

George Reeves; the white rabbit represents his handler

Daria Werbowy Flare Canada magazine September 2009

Daria Werbowy, photographed for Flare Canada magazine in September 2009

Kourtney Kardashian

Kourtney Kardashian

Kendall Jenner

Kendall Jenner

Kylie Jenner Fault magazine

Kylie Jenner on the cover of Fault magazine

Brooklyn Decker

Brooklyn Decker

Ariana Grande

Ariana Grande

Britney Spears

Chrissy Teigen

Chrissy Teigen

Nina Agdal and Robin Marjolein

Nina Agdal and Robin Marjolein

Lana Del Rey

Lana Del Rey

Katy Perry

Katy Perry

Naomi Campbell by David LaChapelle

Naomi Campbell as a ‘Chocolate Bunny’, photographed by David LaChapelle

Naomi Campbell on the cover of V magazine

Nadja Auermann, photographed by Richard Avedon for Versace in 1994

Nadja Auermann, photographed by Richard Avedon for Versace in 1994

Mariah Carey, Nick Cannon and their children Moroccan Scott and Monroe

Doutzen Kroes

Nicole Scherzinger

Irina Shayk

Irina Shayk

Meghan Collison, photographed by Terry Tsiolis for Vogue Russia, November 2007

Meghan Collison, photographed by Terry Tsiolis for Vogue Russia, November 2007

Helen Flanagan

Renée Zellwegger in the film Bridget Jones Diary

Magdalena Berus

Magdalena Berus, photographed for Fiasco magazine

Nicole Richie

Nicole Richie

Ola Rudnicka by Boe Marion for Vogue Netherlands April 2014

Ola Rudnicka, photographed by Boe Marion for Vogue Netherlands in April 2014

Kelly Brook

Dakota Fanning

Dakota Fanning

Sharon Stone on the cover of Playboy magazine’s December 1992 issue

Phoebe Tonkin

Candice Swanepoel

Bridget Marquardt

Bridget Marquardt

Krysten Ritter

Olympia Valance

Doe Deere

Doe Deere; the purple hair and lipstick signify dissociation

Helena Schröder Vogue Hellas January 2010

Helena Schröder on the cover of Vogue Hellas in January 2010

Samantha Fox

Samantha Fox; the guitar is a phallic symbol, and also represents the music used to drive her insane

Doris Day

Doris Day

Fearne Cotton and Holly Willoughby

Lara-Stone-Glamour-Spain-December-2015-

Lara Stone, photographed for Glamour Spain magazine’s December 2015 issue

Romy Schneider, Playboy Magazine [Italy] (August 1980)

Romy Schneider on the cover of Playboy Italy magazine’s August 1980 edition

Cara Delevingne Garage magazine

Cara Delevingne on the cover of Garage magazine

Karen Elson photographed by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia

Karen Elson, photographed by Steven Meisel for Vogue Italia

Bernie Mac Life magazine

Bernie Mac on the cover of Life magazine

Shakira

Shakira

Toni Braxton

Toni Braxton

Holly Robinson Peete

Holly Robinson Peete

Lindsay Lohan Playboy

Lindsay Lohan on the cover of Playboy magazine’s January/February 2012 edition

Kim Kardashian

Kim Kardashian

Sandra Kubicka

Sandra Kubicka

Kate Upton

Kate Upton

Ahn So-hee photographed for Elle magazine

Ahn So-hee photographed for Elle magazine

Suri Cruise

Suri Cruise

Nick Jonas, photographed for Out magazine in May 2016; the stuffed tigers identify him as a prostitute; the stuffed dogs identify him as a courier; the teddy bear represents the demons that possess him (see Marionette)

Gloria Steinem

Gloria Steinem

Steel Panther

Steel Panther (Ralph Saenz (Michael Starr), Darren Leader (Stix Zadinia), Travis Haley (Lexxi Foxx), and Russ Parrish (Satchel))

Eva Ionesco as Alice in Wonderland by Irina Ionesco in 1970 appeared in Vogue Nippon November 2007

Eva Ionesco as Alice in Wonderland, photographed by Irina Ionesco in 1970; appeared in Vogue Nippon’s November 2007 issue. The owl represents Satan and it’s symbolising the ‘Eye of Ra’

Amanda Holden

Amanda Holden

Amber Smith on the cover of Playboy magazine in  March 1995; the colours purple and yellow signify dissociation and fear (see Dissociation/Fear)

Selma Blair

Selma Blair

Leola Bell

Leola Bell

Through the Looking-Glass, which represents the Monarch slave going mad :

Alice Through the Looking Glass Alice perched on the mantel, longing to escape into the shadow world, photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vogue magazine

Alice Through the Looking Glass: Natalia Vodianova, photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vogue US magazine in December 2003

Elle Fanning as Phoebe in Wonderland

Elle Fanning as Phoebe in Wonderland (2008)

Robbie Williams in the music video for You Know Me, where he listens to music, and starts drifting off (dreaming is often used as a symbolic dissociation mechanism) and into dissociation (through the typical showbiz mirror with lights around it, which flash on and off as he dissociates/climbs through the mirror into Wonderland

Robbie Williams in the music video for You Know Me, where he listens to music, and starts drifting off (loud, incessant music is used to drive Monarch slaves insane, then they are drugged (dissociation) and ritually sodomised for demons to possess them. Note the showbiz mirror with lights around it, which flash on and off — ‘the lights are on, but no one’s home’ is slang for insanity

Robbie Williams in the music video for You Know Me2

robbie williams

Whitney Houston I'm Your Baby Tonight

Whitney Houston in the music video for I’m Your Baby Tonight. Note the circular mirror on the right, the spirals (denoting descent into madness) on either side of the window, and the light and dark floor signifying duality

Whitney Houston I'm Your Baby Tonight2

Whitney walks over to the mirror — the hand on the other side represents the demons that have been invoked to possess her, which become a slave’s alter personas

Whitney Houston I'm Your Baby Tonight3

Whitney and her reflection mirror each other against the mirror, symbolising duality: demons mimic a Monarch slave’s voice and mannerisms, stealing the slave’s identity

Whitney Houston I'm Your Baby Tonight4

Whitney climbs through the mirror into Wonderland — symbolising her being subdued with drugs after becoming mad, then being possessed by demons that bind her spiritually

Whitney Houston I'm Your Baby Tonight5

Morten Harket in the music video for A-ha's Take on Me

Morten Harket in the music video for A-ha’s single Take On Me.

Morten is trapped inside a comic book — Wonderland/dissociation, after being driven insane and possessed by demons which bind him spiritually.

A girl in a café reading it falls in love with him and manages to enter his world — the girl represents the demons that possess Morten and ‘enter his world’ or his body.

Morten is trapped ‘through the looking glass’, symbolising his dissociation or madness.

The girl later escapes back into the real world — after demons possess the slave, they mimic their voice and mannerisms and steal the slaves’ identity; they are the ones that interact with the outside world.

The blurring of reality and fantasy

The demonic possession of Morten Harket

Morten tries to break out of the fantasy world

Morten tries to break free of demonic possession and leave the fantasy world/dissociation/Wonderland, symbolised by his throwing himself against the walls

A-ha Take On Me5

He finally breaks out and enters the real world

He is drugged and subdued, ritually sodomised and more demons invoked to possess him, and he returns to his former state of dissociation

Guinevere Van Seenus and Robert McKinnon for Kenzo Paris

Guinevere Van Seenus and Robert McKinnon (entering into a state of madness) in and advertisement for Kenzo Paris

Size distortion, which represents the Monarch slave descending into madness:

Peaches Geldof as Alice in Wonderland, photographed for Company magazine

Nicki Minaj

Beyoncé in the video for her song Kitty Kat

Beyoncé in the video for her song Kitty Kat

Jack Black in Gulliver's Travels

Jack Black in Gulliver’s Travels

Natalia Vodianova, photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Natalia Vodianova, photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vogue US in December 2003

Ekaterina Volkova by Timur Artamonov for Elle Russia March 2010

Ekaterina Volkova, photographed by Timur Artamonov for Elle Russia in March 2010

Amanda Seyfried Vogue Italia July 2002

Amanda Seyfried, photographed for Vogue Italia’s July 2002 edition

Pink flamingos appear in Lewis Caroll’s book, and are used to symbolise Alice in Wonderland. Ancient Egyptians considered this creature to be a living representation of their god Ra. Ra is Satan — demons are the offspring of the devil and fallen angels ~ pink flamingos represent demonic possession.

Beyoncé in the music video for Party

Beyoncé in the music video for Party

Selena Gomez in Disney's Princess Protection Program

Selena Gomez in Disney’s Princess Protection Program

 Nastya Kusakina, photographed by Lena Manakai for Elle Kazakhstan in December 2015

Nastya Kusakina, photographed by Lena Manakai for Elle Kazakhstan in December 2015

Demi Lovato Complex magazine October 2015 pink flamingo

Demi Lovato, photographed for Complex magazine in October 2015

William Shatner and James Spader as flamingos in the American series Boston Legal

'Alice in Wonderland’ with John Galliano as the Queen of Hearts, Alexis Roche as the King of Hearts and Natalia Vodianova as Alice, photographed by Annie Leibowitz for Vogue magazine's December 2003 edition

‘Alice in Wonderland’ with John Galliano as the Queen of Hearts, Alexis Roche as the King of Hearts (both represent demons) and Natalia Vodianova as Alice, photographed by Annie Leibowitz for Vogue magazine’s December 2003 edition

Camille Rowe ELLE France March 2013

Camille Rowe, photographed for Elle France magazine in March 2013

Jennifer Lawrence; the parrot identifies her as an interpreter

Amanda Seyfried playing flamingo croquet, photographed by Mark Seliger for Vogue Italia

Amanda Seyfried playing flamingo croquet, photographed by Mark Seliger for Vogue Italia magazine

Catherine Deneuve, photographed by David Bailey for Vogue magazine in 1968

Catherine Deneuve, photographed by David Bailey for Vogue magazine in 1968

Mélodie Monrose in Harper's Bazaar Nevember 2013

Mélodie Monrose, photographed for Harper’s Bazaar magazine’s November 2013 edition

Kotuleva Yulia Gennadevna Harper's Bazaar Indonesia June 2009

Kotuleva Yulia Gennadevna, photographed for Harper’s Bazaar Indonesia in June 2009

 

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Secrets of Fairytales

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A fairy is an evil spirit. The word ‘fairytales’ derives from the hidden meaning behind these stories, which is known to these spirit beings and those who worship them — referred to in the occult world as the ‘initiated’ or ‘illuminated’ — but hidden from ordinary humans — referred to in the occult world as the ‘profane’ or ‘uninitiated’. Many of these tales present fairies/fairy godmothers as ‘helpers’ and ‘rescuers’.

Myths from Russia, Germany, Japan, China, Persia, Scandinavia, Africa, Australia, North American, South and Central America, Yugoslavia, Britian, France and other places have given rise to numerous folktales and fairytales, which have been adapted to various media for expression, from nursery rhymes to opera. Before the Brothers Grimm — Wilhelm and Jacob — gathered their collection of well-known German folk fairytales into a single written volume in the 19th century, these stories followed an oral tradition, passed down generations.

The earliest oral versions of the most popular (classic) fairytales, and in some cases the earliest print version, included stories of murder, cannibalism, incest, rape, and various other despicable acts.

Early collections of these tales often bore some semblance to modern fairytales, but it was not until 1634 that the first modern fairytales were recorded. Lo Cunto de le Cunti wrote Il Pentamerone (The Tale of Tales), also known as Lo Cunto de le Cunti. It is written in Neapolitan dialect. Volumes 1-3 appeared in 1634, followed by Volume 4 in 1635, and Volume 5 in 1636.

They were published posthumously, as Basile was dead by 1632. Due to difficulty in translating its dialect, the collection was not published in Italian until 1747, German in 1846, and English in 1848.
Il Pentamerone contains many tales that are directly related to many of today’s most popular stories, including Cenerentoa (Cinderella), Sun, Moon and Talia (Sleeping Beauty), Petrsinella (Rapunzel), and Gagliuso (Puss in Boots). Their existence in this collection, albeit in sometimes substantially different versions, shows that the tales did indeed exist in oral tradition and influenced Basile’s writing almost 400 years ago. With the exception of the few similar tales by Straparola, Basile provides the earliest known literary versions of many of today’s fairytales.

Shortly after Basile’s Il Pentamerone was published, The Tales of Mother Goose was published in 1697 by Charles Perrault in France and contained The Story of Sleeping Beauty, Little Red Riding Hood, Cinderella, Puss in Boots, and Tom Thumb. This was followed by Fairy Tales in 1705, which included several Basile stories, such as The Fair One With Golden Locks (Goldilocks).

By 1812, the Brothers Grimm had assembled their famous collection of stories in Grimm’s Fairy Tales, which contains 209 stories. Grimm’s Fairy Tales went through seven editions, as the brothers watered down the stories to make them more suitable for children. The brothers, who were Cabbalistic Jews, included spells, trances and drugs in their versions. Sleeping Beauty (or Little Brier-Rose) is put to sleep (a trance) and the trigger to wake her is a kiss on the lips. This is a reference to witchcraft; they substituted the word ‘hypnotise’ with ‘cast a spell’. (see Monarch slaves). While she is in a trance/asleep she is sexually abused.

Early versions of Sleeping Beauty bore a resemblance to our well-known modern version.

Sleeping Beauty and her Rapist

Wise men warned the great king that his daughter Talia was in grave danger – there was poison in the palace’s flax. A ban was put on flax, but, as expected, Talia still ran a splinter across her finger while spinning flax on the flax-spinning wheel. In great despair, the king placed her sleeping (or dead) body on a velvet cloth and left her in the forest.

Sometime later, a rich nobleman was hunting in the woods when he ran across the abandoned body of Sleeping Beauty. Far from planting a kiss, the nobleman instead raped her sleeping body, from which resulted a pregnancy.

Nine months later, Sleeping Beauty gave birth to twins, and named them Sun and Moon, and the forest fairies took care of them, while Sleeping Beauty continued her slumber. While placing the babies on Sleeping Beauty’s breasts, one of them mistook her thumb for a nipple and sucked out the poison splinter and Talia awoke from her deep sleep.

Months later, the nobleman decided to return to the woods to have more sex with Sleeping Beauty’s body when, to his surprise, he found her awake. The nobleman confessed that he raped her, and they again had sex in the barn. He then returns home to his wife.

The nobleman’s wife found out about the sexual encounter and ordered the children to be kidnapped and cooked alive; the cook prepared the fiendish dish and served it to the nobleman for dinner. As he finished his meal, the wife boldly announced, “You are eating what is your own!”

But it turned out that the cook had a soft heart and, instead of cooking the children, he cooked a goat. Talia, the nobleman and their children then lived happily ever after.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

Snow White, the little Princess, has a cruel stepmother, who is jealous of her. Snow White’s cruel step-mother is jealous of her and always keeps her in rags and in the background.

The cruel step-mother decides to send Snow White to the forest to be killed by one of her servants. However, the servant’s heart melts when Snow White begs for her life, so he leaves her in the woods where she finds a little house which she makes her home. The little house proves to be the home of the Seven Dwarfs. When the seven dwarfs come home from their work of digging gold, they discover  Snow White asleep on one of the beds. In the morning she tells her story, remains with them to keep house and cook their meals, and is very happy.

In the meantime, the cruel step-mother discovers Snow White is still alive so she starts off disguised as an old hag, with a poisoned apple for Snow White. She finds her in the house of the Seven Dwarfs and tempts her with the big, red luscious apple. Snow White can’t resist the apple, she takes one bite and falls, apparently dead.

When the Seven Dwarfs return, Snow White lies lifeless. They all bow their little heads in grief. Then suddenly a prince appears, kisses Snow White, and she comes to life. They are married and live happily ever after. The queen, the cruel step-mother, is swept away by a terrific storm.

Snow White is a Monarch slave. The queen is Snow White’s programmer, who sends Snow White ‘to the woods’ — a fantasy world (over the rainbow/through the looking glass), where she encounters seven dwarfs, who represent a safe haven since they live in the forest, hidden away. The dwarfs work underground, in a mine, representing the unconscious mind. The queen gives Snow White a poisoned apple and she falls into a deep sleep — she is put into a trance and the prince, who is Snow White’s new owner, awakens her with a kiss. The queen disappears since Snow White now has a new handler.

Etymology of kiss:

The word ‘kiss’ is derived from the French baiser (from Latin basiare), which means ‘to have sex’.

Monarch slaves are created during a Satanic ritual that involves ritually sodomising the slave in order to open up spiritual doors (pineal gland) for demons to possess the slave.

In the Disney version, Snow White is a metaphor for drugs, and the Seven Dwarfs are the symptoms of various stages of cocaine addiction: Grumpy, Sleepy, Grouchy, Dopey, Sneezy, Happy, and Doc (you go to the doctor to get treated for addiction). Cocaine is referred to as ‘Snow White’ or ‘White Snow’ or ‘White Lady’ or ‘Snow’ in slang.

In occult symbolism and popular culture,’White Horse’ is also a metaphor for heroin/mind-altering substances, and ‘White Pony’ is a metaphor for cocaine.

Cinderella

In this tale, Cinderella’s father remarried after her mother died. Her step-mother treated Cinderella with cruelty, forcing her to wait on her two daughter and perform menial chores. They took her beautiful clothes away from her, dressed her in an old gray smock, and gave her wooden shoes. She had to sleep by the hearth in the ashes. And because she always looked dusty and dirty, they called her Cinderella. One day it happened that the father was going to the fair, and Cinderella asked for the first twig that brushed against his hat on his way home. On his way home, as he was riding through a green thicket, a hazel twig brushed against him and knocked off his hat. Then he broke off the twig and took it with him. Arriving home, he gave Cinderella the twig from the hazel bush.

Cinderella thanked him, went to her mother’s grave, and planted the branch on it, and she wept so much that her tears fell upon it and watered it. It grew and became a beautiful tree.

Cinderella went to this tree three times every day, and beneath it she wept and prayed. A white bird came to the tree every time, and whenever she expressed a wish, the bird would throw down to her what she had wished for.

This story is about witchcraft. The hazel bush is a witch hazel bush — Cinderella becomes a witch, practising a ritual based on three key magical principles:

  • Decide on a goal
  • Visualise the end result
  • Focus your intent, or will, to manifest that result

The white bird that grants her wishes represents Satan as the white dove (see The Great Deception).

The Princess and the Frog

The Princess and the Frog

Cover for the children’s book The Princess and the Frog

The princess represents Europa, Noah’s great-granddaughter, and the frog represents the quinotaur, an amphibious half-bull, half-fish creature, which kidnapped and raped her (see Pagan gods).

Beauty and the Beast

The Beast represents Beauty’s handler, who is abusive and cruel. Her father sells her to the Beast and Beauty is turned into a Monarch slave using torture and demonic possession. The prince or ‘Prince Charming’ is also her handler.

Prince Charming

This is a character who appears in some fairytales. He is the prince who comes to the rescue of the damsel in distress. This classification suits most heroes of a number of traditional folk tales, including Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, even if in the original story they were given another name, or no name at all.

These characters are often handsome and romantic, a foil to the heroine, and are seldom deeply characterised, or even distinguishable from other such men who marry the heroine. Prince Charming is a witch — a charm is an incatation or magic spell, which he uses to gain control over his victims.

Little Mermaid

A mermaid is an ancient aquatic hybrid that survived the flood. The story is a salute to the fallen angels who created these, and other, hybrids (see Transhumanism and Cyborgism and Who is the Neanderthal man?).

The Adventures of Pinocchio

This tale of a stubborn marionette’s quest to become a real boy was originally written in 1880 by Freemason Carlo Lorenzini, as Storia di un Burattino (Story of a Marionette), also called Le Avventure di Pinocchio, and published weekly in Il Giornaledei Bambini — the first Italian newspaper for children.

In 1883, Le Avventure di Pinocchio was published in Italy. The moral of ‘being good’ and ‘not lying’ is really about a man’s search for wisdom and enlightenment. The man (Pinocchio) becomes a Freemason initiate (illuminated) and is sodomised by the Master Mason (Geppetto) as part of his initiation, and so becomes a ‘real boy’.

Pinocchio’s nose ‘grows’ as he climbs up the Freemasonic ladder. Etymologically, the word nose derives from Old English næs, and from here we get naze, which means ‘promontory’ or ‘headland’, very close in meaning to Cyrano’s ‘peninsula’. It does jut out and command attention and one’s sense of self in the world is often greatly affected by it. This is what happens when Pinocchio becomes a Freemason.

The Shoemaker and the Elves

The elves help the shoemaker by designing and making beautiful shoes for him at night while he and his wife sleep. The shoemaker becomes a rich man from the sale of these shoes. Elves are helpers in witchcraft, demonism and the occult — they are evil spirits.

A host of supernatural beings and spirits who exist between earth and heaven… Fairies (elves) are fall angels. When God cast Lucifer from heaven, the angels who were loyal to Lucifer plunged down toward hell with him. — Rosemary Ellen Guiley, The Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft, p. 115

Some fairies (elves) were said to suck human blood like vampires. — Rosemary Ellen Guiley, The Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft, p. 116

Guiley also writes that elves ‘love to visit new born babies of mortals and will not hesitate to steal’ — The Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft, p. 116

Helena Petrovna Blavatsky, a Russian occultist, writes that elves are ‘disembodied spirits’ used in ‘magic and sorcery’ and are ‘the principal agents in… seances’. — HP Blavatsky, Isis Unveiled, Volume I, p. 262

Elves are also called ‘trolls’:

…the word troll comes from the Old Norse word for demon and is defined by some sources as a ‘devil’: a person of great wickedness or maliciousness… Of course, Santa has his elves too. — Cathy Burns, Masonic and Occult Symbols Illustrated, p. 67

Elf: A small, often mischievous creature considered to have magical powers. Although some of these creatures may appear cute on the surface, all of them are nonetheless demonic entities that have their origins in the occult world. — Cathy Burns, Masonic and Occult Symbols Illustrated, p. 67

Elves: Living beneath the surface of the earth, they have ties to the world of the dead; these ‘little people’ are often thought of as inhabitants of the underworld (hell). — Hans Biedermann, Dictionary of Symbolism, p. 107

These elves often appear to children and even play with them. The moment an adult comes on the scene, the elves disappear… if a person wants their help, he must apply to their chief, the devil himself. This, however, would cost a person his salvation. The idea these spirits are demonic in origins is in accordance with the Bible. — Kurt Koch, Occult ABC, p. 82, 83

Leprechauns, fairies, pixies, imps, trolls, gnomes, twinkies, sylphs, dryads, kelpies, sprites, lares and elves are all demons, who shape-shift into these forms to be able to approach children.

PARENTS, WHEN YOUR CHILD CLAIMS TO HAVE AN IMAGINARY FRIEND, GENTLY QUESTION THEM TO DISCOVER WHETHER THIS ‘FRIEND’ IS, IN FACT, A DEMON. ALSO, PAY ATTENTION TO YOUR CHILDREN’S DRAWINGS, AS THEY TEND TO DRAW WHAT THEY SEE OR DREAM ABOUT.

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

This is the story of Quasimodo, a hunchback, who falls in love with a beautiful gypsy, Esmeralda. Hunchbacks are a result of genetic mutation caused by the corruption of our DNA by fallen angels in the pre-flood world, and by aquatic hybrids in the post-flood world. Gypsies are also hybrids resulting from this mutation.

Dick Whittington and his Cat

Richard Whittington and his cat, from The New Wonderful Museum, and Extraordinary Magazine, London, 1808

This is a fairytale — developed into a pantomime — about Richard Whittington, four-time mayor of London between 1397 and 1419, famed for his cat’s ‘ratting abilities’. Whittington did not own a cat, and the story is really about his mistress/Sex Kitten, Ann, a Monarch slave who made him a fortune by hiring her out to other men as a sex slave.

Puss in Boots

The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots by Charles Perrault, is the story of a miller whose only inheritance to his three sons was his mill, his donkey and his cat.
The ‘cat’ is really a Sex Kitten or sex slave. His youngest son inherited this slave, and she made him a very rich man.

Jack and the Beanstalk

This story is about Jacob, the son of Isaac, who dreamt about a stairway to Heaven (Genesis 28:10-15), known as Jacob’s Ladder in the occult world. In occult symbolism, the number 6 represents the soul of man, and the number 7 represents spiritual perfection. Thus, in Freemasonry, as the initiate climbs ‘Jacob’s Ladder’ toward godhood, the number 13 represents rebellion, apostasy, defection, corruption, disintegration and revolution (6+7=13). 13 occurs first in Genesis 14:4.

Jack is Jacob, and the beanstalk represents the stairway, while the bag of gold, the singing golden harp and the goose that lays golden eggs represent Yahweh’s promises to Jacob; his Divine inheritance and that of his offspring (the land of Canaan, numerous posterity and protection from Yahweh, the God of Heaven and Earth).

The cutting down of the beanstalk symbolises the separation of the Israelite’s from their God and Creator, because they turned away from Him and worshipped foreign/pagan gods. As a result, Yahweh no longer communicates with them directly, through prophets and judges — symbolised by the giant being unable to come down to earth (although, of course our Heavenly Father is NOT an ogre!).

Robin Hood

Robin Hood is Yahshua, our King, Saviour, Master and Messiah. His Merry Men represent Yahshua’s disciples; and Little John, the most prominent of them, is John, the beloved of Yahshua’s disciples.
Yahshua and His disciples travelled the world during His three years of ministry, to preach to the Gentiles, that is how they became incorporated into English folklore. Yahshua and His disciples would take the money donated to them by the rich and share it with the poor.

Peter Pan

Peter Pan is a character in the book Peter Pan, also known as Peter Pan; or the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, written by Scottish author J.M. Barrie as a 1904 play and a 1911 novel

Peter Pan alludes to the satyr Pan — in Greek mythology, Pan is the insatiable Arcadian god of lust and magic who seduces men and women with his pipes and wantonness, the symbol of the libido in its sexual aspect, vagrant male sexuality, the personification of undisciplined procreation in nature. Peter is slang for ‘penis’, so Peter Pan means ‘Penis god’.

Peter Pan and Tinkerbell

Peter Pan and Tinkerbell — Tinkerbell is a fairy ~ fairies are demons

Peter Pan is Satan; he flies across the skies. Satan wants to be like Yahweh Almighty and deceive mankind into worshipping him (see Symbolism of Superheroes, The truth about Santa Claus, Sun worship and The Great Deception):

“How you have fallen from heaven, Lucifer, son of the morning! You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to the heavens: I will raise my throne above the stars of Yahweh; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, in the sides of the north. I will ascend above the tops of the clouds; I will be like the Most High.” Isaiah 14:12-14

“There is none like the God of Jeshurun, Who rides across the heavens to help you, and on the clouds in His Majesty.” Deuteronomy 33:26

Satan is the prince of ‘the power of the air’.

“In which you used to live when you followed the ways of this world, and of the prince of the power of the air, the spirit which is now at work in the children of disobedience.” Ephesians 2:2

In Peter and Wendy, by the same author, Wendy Moira Angela Darling is a girl who falls in love with Peter, she represents Satan’s human wife Astarte. Tinkerbell represents Tammuz, their first-born son.

Hansel and Gretel

Hansel and GretelHansel and Gretel, the children of a poor woodcutter, are taken into the woods and abandoned by their father, at the order of their evil step-mother after an immense famine settles over the land and there’s not enough to eat. They get lost and are unable to find their way back home, and they encounter a cannibalistic witch living in the woods in a house constructed of cake and confectionery.

In the fairytale, the witch is simply wants to cook and eat the children. She is a cannibal, but her attempt to cook them is also her attempt to initiate them into the craft — in shamanic initiation narratives, one emerges as a shaman after being killed and cooked; a psychic experience. (Psychic experiences of initiates being cooked up by magical entities have been reported worldwide, from the Australian Aboriginals, to the Inuit people of the North Pole, and Siberia.)

The central practice of shamanism is journeying. One journeys through an ecstatic state to other worlds — known as astral projection. Shamans employ various technologies to make ecstatic journeys: chanting, drumming, dance, fasting, all night vigils, or the ingestion of hallucinogenic plants. Shamanic practice can be done individually or communally.

Hansel is locked up in a cage and fed to fatten him up for eating. Gretel seems to be the witch’s apprentice — she isn’t locked up like her brother, but she’s made a slave. Gretel is fed nothing but crawfish, and crab shells. Originating in ancient Mesopotamia, and working its way through Egypt, Greece, and Rome, the image of the shellfish has always been associated with the Moon, which is why the astrological sign of Cancer is ruled by it. Given the natural association of the moon to witchcraft, Gretel’s shellfish diet is preparing her to fulfill the initiation, however, the siblings refuse. Gretel pushes the witch into the fire and refuses to be initiated, and become a witch like her. They kill the witch.

Therefore, Hansel and Gretel are able to achieve the same results of magical enlightenment without having to experience initiation, by killing the witch. Hansel and Gretel are now witches and able to talk to animals after killing the witch — Gretel is able to talk to a swan, and both of them were able to miraculously, considering how lost they were before, find their way home. These are the results of completing the magic journey.

Little Red Riding Hood

The story revolves around a girl called Little Red Riding Hood. She is named after the red hooded cape/cloak that she wears. The girl walks through the woods to deliver food to her sickly grandmother (wine and cake depending on the translation). In the Grimms’ version, her mother had ordered her to stay strictly on the path.

Little Red Riding Hood is also about shamanic initiation. She wears a red cape — red is the colour of occult initiation; she journeys to the woods; she is almost killed by the wolf, but saved by a huntsman. Her mother warns her not to stray from the path, which is symbolic of the path of occult initiation entailing forbidden knowledge of magic that leads to ‘enlightenment’.

Aladdin

Aladdin is King Solomon, who used his wisdom to communicate with the lower beings. The magic carpet represents his astral projection, through which he travelled the world. (During astral projection, one falls into a demonic-induced trance and is then mentally transported to wherever they wish to go; and is able to see and psychically communicate with others in a similar state. IT IS IMPOSSIBLE FOR THE SPIRIT TO LEAVE THE BODY UNLESS DEATH OCCURS. But the demons convince them that this is what happens.) The lamp represents his introduction to Freemasonry; the genie represents the demons that assisted him.

King Solomon was able to summon demons and command them to do his will — this only leads to enslavement by demons, as eventually their will becomes your own, and you end up serving them. Solomon could speak in birds’ and serpents’ languages (which are also taught at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry in the Harry Potter series). His folly was in marrying foreign wives, who worshipped pagan gods, and he also fell into the trap of this evil practice.

As a result of the influence of these evil beings, Solomon introduced the Freemason society into his kingdom, using the stolen knowledge they taught him. (Freemasonry first existed in the pre-flood world and was revived in the post-flood world by King Nimrod.)

There is a book known as The Lesser Key of Solomon, a handbook of sorcery used by magicians, which contains names, seals and functions of demons, purported to be the same as those the king conversed with, as well as a collection of orations or prayers which are interspersed with magical words, exquisite drawings, and figures illustrating how to conjure evil spirits.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz

The occultist L. Frank Baum, a member of the Theosophical Society (which is connected to Freemasonry, Satanism and Lucis Trust) was inspired by a spirit (fallen angel or demon) who gave him the ‘magic key’ to write the The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a fairytale incorporating the ancient wisdom of the Mystery Religions, which came out in 1900.

The moral of the book is that we must rely upon ourselves, for we alone have the power to save ourselves — this was part of Satan’s lie in the Garden of Eden; that man can become like God. Dorothy is taken from her home in Kansas to the Land of Oz by a cyclone — the word ‘cyclone’ derives from the Greek word kyklon which means ‘moving in a circle, whirling around’. It is a spiral, representing a wormhole or stargate. Oz is ‘the land down under’, which is to say, Dorothy is transported to the underworld realm of the dead through the Silver Gate.

Kansas is home to Stull Cemetery, which is an interdimensional portal (gateway to Hell). Superman, who is a representation of Satan, grew up in Kansas.

This circle that carried off Dorothy to Oz represents a snake (Satan, who is behind the evil of Monarch slaves). The Land of Oz is a reference to hell, as seen in the written classic texts of John Milton. The Wizard of Oz refers to Osiris, Egyptian god of the afterlife, the underworld and the dead (Satan); and the Land of Oz is the Land of Osiris.

Dorothy’s three companions, the Lion (courage), Tin Man (purity) and the Scarecrow (intellect), represent the physical, emotional and mental attributes we will achieve incarnation, according to the teachings of Theosophy:

There is no danger that dauntless courage cannot conquer; there is no trial that spotless purity cannot pass through; there is no difficulty that strong intellect cannot surmount. — John Algeo, The Wizard of Oz: The Perilious Journey, The Quest Summer 1933. Wheaton, Il.: Theosophical Society in Amer., p. 53

The book’s message is that Dorothy and her companions have the ability to save themselves if only they rely on their own powers through the good Witch of the South (there is nothing good about witchcraft, both white and black magic are sourced from evil spirits). Dorothy appears to be a harmless and simple little girl, but it is she who kills both the wicked witches of East and West. Tin Man seems to lack a heart, but he is so full of sentiment that he is always weeping, the Cowardly Lion takes brave action whenever it is required, the Scarecrow seems to lack brains, but he has all the ideas for the company. The Wizard seems to be great and powerful, but he is actually a humbug (a humbug is a hypocrite; humbug also means deceptive or false talk or behaviour ~ the wizard is Satan who is the father of lies). Oz seems to be a glorious and delightful land and Kansas dry, dull and gray, but Oz is fantasy and Kansas is real (Monarch slaves live in a constant state of dissociation and fear). Kansas is black and white, while Oz is in colour.

Dorothy has a dog, Toto — Toto represents her intuition which she loses when she becomes mad.

(In the book, Dorothy falls asleep in a field of poppies — opium, codeine, morphine, heroine, darvocet, percocet, oxycontin, demerol, vicodin, to name a few, are all derived from Opium poppy, a sedative plant — thos represents the permanently dissociative state in which Monarch slaves live. In the film, Dorothy becomes unconscious, the world begins spinning and then she sees disjointed pictures. Later, she says, “My! People come and go so quickly.” These ‘people’ represent the demons or alter personas that control Dorothy.)

Professor Marvel uses a crystal ball (for divination) which he claims was used by the priests of Isis, Egyptian goddess of magic and life.

Elvira Gulch is a woman who owns half of the county where Dorothy lives in Kansas, she is shown later in the Land of Oz transformed into a witch. The Illuminati elite lead double lives — presenting themselves as respectable members of society, but in reality are Satanists who practise human sacrifice, murder and cannibalism.

Dorothy kills the Wicked Witch of the West with a sharp blow to the forehead with the witch’s staff. In Satanic rituals to transfer power, a Matriarch (or Mother of Darkness) will kill the person in a position of authority with a strike on the forehead with a special mace/staff and then put on their slippers. Red slippers are used as a symbol of authority at the Matriarch level of witches. (Dorothy wears red shoes.)

Oz is shaped like a mandala with the Emerald City at its centre — an impassable barrier, four-sided, four symbolic colours, the circle and its centre (sun worship symbolism). The route that Dorothy follows in Oz has the shape of a ‘T’ with its three points defining an inverted triangle. The Emerald City symbolises a fraudulent world, since it was not really green in truth. It was a make believe thing that pretended to have value. It also symbolises American currency/dollar (green paper), since it wasn’t as valuable as everyone had thought. Green is also the fourth point of the Eastern Star, and Satan’s colour. (There is an Emerald City on the moon.) The Yellow Brick Road represents gold, the perfect metal, considered to be Divine and the source of wisdom by the Illuminati. It is the path to illumination.

The book is full of Satanic activity and Satanic thinking, and the story was chosen in the late 1940s to be used in the Illuminati’s trauma-based witchcraft to create Monarch slaves.

Judy Garland, who had been programmed at an early age, was chosen to act as Dorothy. Judy’s later husband and handler, Mickey De Vinko, was a Satanist and the chief assistant to Roy Radin, a rich Satanist who worked with the Illuminati, and who controlled the Process Church covens, which had as members mass murderers Berkowitz and Charles Mason (a Monarch slave). There are also several members of the Carr family, who are also tied to both De Vinko and Radin’s Process Church.

The 14 books of the Wizard of Oz series are: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, The Land of Oz, Ozma of Oz, Dorothy and the Wizard in Oz, The Road to Oz, The Emerald City of Oz, The Patchwork Girl of Oz, Tik-tok of Oz, The Scarecrow of Oz, Rinkitnk in Oz, The Lost Princess of Oz, The Tinman Woodsman of Oz, The Magic of Oz and Glinda of Oz.

The Illuminati have built large Wizard of Oz theme parks (similar to those of Disney) to double as torture centres, such as the MGM complex in Las Vegas. The parks are used to in the creation of Monarch slaves.

Wizard of Oz is about the search for illumination, which is found by following the ‘Yellow Brick Road’ to Emerald City. The Nome King represents the ruler of the demons in hell.

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (and its sequel Through the Looking-Glass) was written by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer) under the pseudonym Lewis Caroll. It is one of the most mystical and surreal works in literature. Beyond its impact on modern culture and art, the book has influenced the occult world — Satanist Aleister Crowley required that his magicians read both books.

The themes of dissociation, confusion and many other psychological aspects are present in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. The inspiration for the tale originated from Dodgson’s relationship with a minor named Alice Liddell, who was a Monarch slave.

Alice Liddell, photographed by Dodgson

Alice Liddell, photographed by Dodgson

Dodgson and Alice kissing

Dodgson and Alice kissing

Alice’s abuse began with her father, Oxford University Vice-Chancellor Henry Liddell (from 1870-1874), who was also the Dean of Christ Church (where Dodgson met Liddell and his family), and who allowed her to be used by men. Henry Liddell and Charles Dodgson were Alice’s handlers.

Of principal importance is that these books were written by a mathematician. Mathematics is a divine science, not because of its abstractions but because of what its study does to the consciousness.
The basis of a real or spiritual psychology is found in the fact that man must create the substance of his own consciousness, and that unless he does this his consciousness is borrowed from his associates and his environment, and as a result he is in constant bondage to these factors.

The fundamental equilibrium of nature is that everything returns to its own state, or retreats eventually within its own being or consciousness.
All goes back to consciousness, so the foundation of creation is idea. When the processes of apparent change are completed, everything involved returns to its original state. Man recognises this in his mental and creative processes, as in the necessity of starting from fixed foundations of understanding, and science at last sees this same striving for equilibrium through nature.

Therefore, in the book, the constant replacement of the key is symbolic, as is the constant closing of the door to the little garden. The symbolism of the table: The glass suggests consciousness, and the three legs suggest activity, substance and form. In life man, by his own efforts, must hold all things in manifestation.

‘Going down the Rabbit Hole’ is a metaphor for taking drugs; as is eating the ‘magic’ mushroom. Alice is drugged so that she can dissociate and enable her handler (Dodgson) to abuse and programme her — invoke demons to possess and control her. The White Rabbit represents the programmer/handler who sodomises the slave. Going down the rabbit hole is code for sodomy.

‘Looking Glass’ is the Victorian name for a mirror, which is actually a piece of glass with a foil back in which you can see your reflection. Reflections are reproductions, with a difference, of the real world. They’re the opposite, or backwards version, of normal things. Through the looking glass Lewis Caroll plays with different kinds of reversal, reflection and opposition. Sometimes it’s time that seems to work backwards, such as when the White Queen bleeds first and then pricks her finger. Sometimes it’s distance, such as when Alice has to walk toward Looking-Glass House in order to get away from it. Sometimes cause and effect are themselves reversed, such as when Alice and the Red Queen have to run in order to stay still.

Alice in Wonderland is about a young girl dissociating from the trauma of sexual abuse into an alternate reality (her different sizes in the book represent the process of dissociation), but is also about a young girl maturing into puberty. When Humpty Dumpty tells Alice, who is seven-and-a-half, that she should ‘have left off at seven’, he is mirroring Dodgson’s thoughts, who would have preferred that Alice remain a cute little girl (he was a paedophile) and never grow up.

Alice has a cat named Dinah. The cat doesn’t physically exist in the book, but Alice talks about her many times, especially about the fact that she is good at hunting and killing animals. Dinah is Alice’s Sex Kitten alter, and also an allusion to Alice as a prostitute or sex slave for hire.

King Midas

The Greek mythology of King Midas, who was able to turn anything he touched into gold, is about alchemy. Alchemy is the medieval forerunner of chemistry, which is concerned with the transmutation of matter, in particular with attempts to convert base metals into gold, or find a universal elixir.

Lwanda Magere

This is a Luo (of Kenya) folktale about a great warrior whose body was made of hard rock. Lwanda could not be killed or even wounded in battle, until the Nandi — with whom the Luo were in constant conflict and whose many warriors were felled by Lwanda’s spear — decided to send the most beautiful of their girls to him as a second wife, as a sign of goodwill. One day Lwanda fell ill during his first wife’s absence (who always nursed him back to health), and the medicine man prescribed herbs to be rubbed on him. To his second wife’s surprise, Lwanda asked her to make cuts on his shadow and administer the herbs. After seeing blood flow from the cuts, she finally learned the secret of his strength, and crept out in the night to relay the information to her people.
The Nandi then planned an attack and Lwanda was killed by a spear that struck his shadow.

Lwanda’s body represents the soul, which is a mass of energy that can only be destroyed by its Creator — Yahweh Almighty (see The Body, the Soul and the Spirit); the shadow represents every man’s Achilles’ heel, by which the evil forces work to destroy us and eventually cause our downfall.

Duality/Black Mass

Standard

The Illuminati/Freemasons use occult symbols on everything they own, which is basically everything; they own the entertainment industry, the world’s governments, international companies, the United Nations, Red Cross, World Health Organization, International Monetary Fund, World Bank…

The symbol for Duality is Black and White, usually represented by the Masonic/Freemasons’ checkered floor:

Masonic checkered floor

Masonic Lodge

It represents the duality of life: Good verses Evil, and is used for cross dimensional travel (by demons and fallen angels) and communication with evil spirits. The rituals performed on the checkered floor involve blood sacrifices. Sacrifices open up certain doors called ‘stargates’ (portals/interdimensional doorways used by evil spirits to access our physical world from their spiritual one) between dimensions.

Black and White also represents the Monarch slave and their alter personas, which are the demons that possess the slave. The multiple images used to symbolise Monarch slaves’ duality represent the legion of demons that possess them that mimic their voice and mannerisms — that is why the images are identical.

Red and Blue is also an occult symbol for duality.

The symbol for Black Mass is Black and Red. Black represents darkness/evil and Red represents the spilling of blood/sacrifice. These colours are used to identify Monarch slaves (see Monarch slaves).

Let us look at some of the places these colours appear:

Chess board

Chessboard

Brittany Murphy on Masonic Checkerboard floor in the film Little Black Book

Brittany Murphy on Masonic checkered floor in the film Little Black Book

Michael Jackson's album cover for 'Blood On The Dance Floor'. Note the mirages of pyramids on the floor on his right, representing the transition from the material plane to the spiritual world. Note that the buildings are 'submerged' in the floor, they are in between both dimensions and Michael is wearing red, the colour of sacrifice.

Michael Jackson’s album cover for Blood On The Dance Floor. Note the mirages of pyramids on the floor on his left, representing the transition from the material plane to the spiritual world (a mirage is an illusion, and a pyramid symbolises the three attributes of Yahweh: Will, Love and Intelligence; since the pyramids are beneath the floor on the ‘other side’, where Satan is, the illusion is that Satan is as powerful as Yahweh — a powerful message). Note that the buildings are ‘submerged’ in the floor, they are between both dimensions, and Michael is wearing red, the colour of sacrifice, and black shoes, so he is to be a Black Mass sacrifice. The shadows in the background represent the demons that possessed him (see Mickey Mouse and Peter Pan)

When you open the CD booklet you will see this image:

Michael is standing on a door and pointing to the floor. He's telling us that he is to be sacrificed so that a 'stargate' will open

Michael is standing on a door and pointing to the floor. His handlers are telling us that he is to be sacrificed so that a ‘stargate’ will open. Michael is wearing white and gold. White represents purity and healing and gold is a symbol of royalty. His black and white fedora symbolises duality (he was a Monarch slave)

Thriller album cover

Thriller album cover. Michael had extensive plastic surgery, not only to alter his appearance in order to despise the image of our Creator, Yahweh Almighty, Who created us in His own image (see Transhumanism and Cyborgism), but also to symbolise the theme of Duality that was present in his life. He was born a Black man, but morphed into a White man; Michael also sang a song titled Black or White, and that is why he wore trousers that exposed his White socks and Black shoes. Also, Michael almost always wore the colours of Black Mass and Duality

Cover for the album 'Bad'

Cover for the album Bad; the buckles symbolise Michael’s bondage

Michael Jackson and Eddie Murphy

Michael Jackson and Eddie Murphy. The buckles on Michael’s trousers and jacket represent his bondage; the red armband identifies him as a blood sacrifice

Cover for Toni Braxton's debut album

Cover for Toni Braxton’s debut album. Blue is another important colour in occult symbolism. It is the colour that connects us to our spiritual side and the energy of the universe. The sky/heaven is blue

Cover for Dionne Warwick's single Heartbreaker

Cover for Dionne Warwick’s single Heartbreaker

Album cover for Bonnie Tyler's Angel Heart

Album cover for Bonnie Tyler’s Angel Heart

Michael Jackson’s children; Paris, Prince Michael and Michael Joseph

Book cover for Tom Robbins’ Jitterbug Perfume; inside the bottle is Satan sending out his angels to wreak havoc in the world

Tulisa Contostavlos on the cover of The Times Magazine

Tulisa Contostavlos on the cover of The Times Magazine

Michelle Obama on the cover of Ebony

Michelle Obama on the cover of Ebony. Michelle, a Monarch slave, is symbolising the Left Hand Path sign (see Satanic Hand Signs)

CHICAGO - NOVEMBER 04: U.S. President elect Barack Obama stands on stage along with his wife Michelle and daughters Malia (red dress) and Sasha (black dress) during an election night gathering in Grant Park on November 4, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois. Obama defeated Republican nominee Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) by a wide margin in the election to become the first African-American U.S. President elect. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

U.S. President elect Barack Obama stands on stage along with his wife Michelle and daughters Malia (red dress) and Sasha (black dress) during an election night gathering in Grant Park on November 4, 2008 in Chicago, Illinois, U.S.

Poster for the film The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Poster for the film The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus

Sarah Palin on the cover of Newsweek magazine

Sarah Palin on the cover of Newsweek magazine

Jackie Chan on the cover of Success magazine

Jackie Chan on the cover of Success magazine

Steve Martin, photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Cover album for BoysIIMen's A Journey Through Hitsville USA

Cover album for Boyz II Men’s A Journey Through Hitsville USA

Janet Jackson in 1982

Janet Jackson in 1982; note the lip pattern on her socks, the lips represent kisses — a ‘kiss’ signifies ritual sodomy

Kimora Lee Simmons

Eminem

Eminem, who has an alter persona named ‘Stan’ (Satan)

Cheryl Cole, photographed by David Vasiljevic for the July 2013 issue of InStyle magazine

Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin

Album cover for Ace of Base's Da Capo (da capo is a musical term meaning 'back to the beginning'

Album cover for Ace of Base’s Da Capo (da capo is a musical term meaning ‘back to the beginning’; the band is forming a cross (an ‘x’ is a diagonal cross)

Cover for David Guetta's single Sexy Bitch featuring Akon

Cover for David Guetta’s single Sexy Bitch featuring Freemason Akon. Note the sunburst in the background, representing sun worship

Logo for Mitsubishi

Logo for Mitsubishi

Johnny Depp in the Lone Ranger

Kitchen scene from the television series The Nanny

Kitchen scene from the British television sitcom The Nanny

G4S logo, a British multinational security services company

G4S logo

Poster for movie Music and Lyrics

Poster for movie Music and Lyrics. This movie is a salute to the pagan god/demon Buddha (a Moonchild), and features several statues of him; also we see a mermaid sculpture in Alex Fletcher’s apartment, another salute to fallen angels, who are responsible for hybrids (see Pagan gods)

John Lennon. Only John's left eye is visible, symbolising the Eye of Horus, and his right eye is covered with a sunflower, symbolising sun worship

John Lennon. Only John’s left eye is visible, symbolising the ‘eye of horus’ (occult knowledge/hidden wisdom), and his right eye is covered with a sunflower, symbolising the ‘Eye of Ra’ (sun worship)

Oprah Winfrey on the cover of Vogue magazine’s October 1998 edition

Album cover for Miriam Makeba's A Promise

Album cover for Miriam Makeba’s A Promise

Cover for Miriam Makeba's compilation album

Miriam Makeba on the album cover for Le Monde de Miriam Makeba

Cover for Charlie Pride's single Crystal Chandeliers

Cover for Charley Pride’s single Crystal Chandeliers

Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods

Tiger Woods and Elin Nordegren

Tiger Woods and Elin Nordegren

Kerry Washington, Connie Britton, Anna Gunn, Kate Mara, Elisabeth Moss and Monica Potter on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter

From left: Kate Mara, Monica Potter, Kerry Washington, Connie Britton, Elizabeth Moss and Anna Gunn on the cover of The Hollywood Reporter

Logo for You Tube

Logo for YouTube

Logo for International Committee of the Cross

Logo for International Committee of the Red Cross

Catholic Cardinals

Catholic Cardinals

Formula 1 flag

Formula 1 flag

British police hats

British police hats; note the crown and laurel wreath insignia. When chewed, laurel leaves release toxins that cause a psychotropic effect. Ancient soothsayers and prophets used it to achieve a trance for meditation in their ‘prophesying’. In ancient Greece the laurel was identified with Apollo, the god of light and the sun. The laurel wreath is featured in the logo of the United Nations and the United States Seal, symbolising that the organisation associates itself with the Solar Cult and with other groups under the same wreath

Album cover for Selana's Entre A Mi Mundo (Enter My World)

Album cover for Selena’s Entre A Mi Mundo (Enter My World)

Reception area of the Sarova Stanley Hotel, Nairobi

Reception area of the Sarova Stanley Hotel, Nairobi

Album cover for Salt n Pepa's A Salt with a Deadly Pepa

Album cover for Salt-N-Pepa’s A Salt with a Deadly Pepa

An edition of Josie and the Pussycats, a comic book published by Archie Comics

Interior of Chiltern Firehouse, a restaurant in Marylebone, London

Interior of Chiltern Firehouse, a restaurant in Marylebone, London

Sean Paul on the cover of 3 magazine

Sean Paul on the cover of L3 Magazine

Cover for El DeBarge's self-titled debut album

Cover for El DeBarge’s self-titled debut album

Iman and her daughter Zulekha Haywood

Iman and her daughter Zulekha Haywood. Iman is wearing a key pendant; in occult symbolism the key represents those properties which unlock the mystical ‘wisdom’ of the occult. It also represents the unlocking of ‘latent psychic powers’, thereby opening the doors to the supernatural realm. In Freemasonry, the symbol of the key is used to convey the importance of the order’s secrets, which are to be kept within the brotherhood alone. Also note the zebra print on the wall — identifying them as sex slaves for hire

Whoopi Goldberg photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Whoopi Goldberg photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Cover for New Edition's single If It Isn't Love

Cover for New Edition’s single If It Isn’t Love

Grace Jones on the poster for the film Vamp

Cover for 98 Degrees single Give Me Just One Night

Cover for 98 Degrees single Give Me Just One Night (Una Noche)

Keanu Reeves on the cover of Empire magazine

Keanu Reeves on the cover of Empire magazine

Album cover Bebe Winan's Love and Freedom

Album cover Bebe Winans’ Love and Freedom

Brooke Shields

Brooke Shields

Sergio Ramos on the cover of Men's Health magazine

Sergio Ramos on the cover of Men’s Health magazine; Sergio is symbolising ‘As Above, So Below’

Video frame from Westlife's song Fool Again

Video frame from Westlife’s song Fool Again

Album cover for Shanice's Inner Child

Album cover for Shanice’s Inner Child

Benjamin Bratt and Talisa Soto on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine

Benjamin Bratt and Talisa Soto on the cover of Vanity Fair magazine

Album cover for Femi Kuti's Fight to Win

Album cover for Femi Kuti’s Fight to Win

Cover for Conway Twitty's album Final Touches

Cover for Conway Twitty’s album Final Touches

Rosamund Pike

Rosamund Pike

Viagra (also known as Nu Virgos) on the cover of VIVA! magazine

Stephanie Seymour

Stephanie Seymour

Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

Jeff Goldblum and the Mildred Snitzer Orchestra poster

Gene Simmons Rolling Stone

Gene Simmons on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine

Cover for Nana_Mouskouri's album Du Und Ich (You and I)

Cover for Nana Mouskouri’s album Du Und Ich (You And I)

Angela Bassett on the cover of Essence magazine

Angela Bassett on the cover of Essence magazine

Lewis Hamilton on the cover of GQ magazine

Rene Russo on the cover of Cosmopolitan

Rene Russo on the cover of Cosmopolitan

Don Johnson in The Other Woman

Don Johnson in The Other Woman

Models Alessio Pozzi, Andre Bona and Roberto Sipos on the cover of L’Officiel Hommes Thailand

Models Alessio Pozzi, Andre Bona and Roberto Sipos on the cover of L’Officiel Hommes Thailand. The bars signify enslavement

Cover for Bobby Womack's album So Many Rivers

Cover for Bobby Womack’s album So Many Rivers

Album cove for George Michael's Songs from the Last Century

Album cover for George Michael’s Songs from the Last Century

Sophie Marceau on the cover of Amica magazine (Italy)

Fantasia Barrino

Fantasia Barrino

Karen Mulder

Karen Mulder

Glenn Close as Cruella de Vil in 101 Dalmatians

Glenn Close as Cruella de Vil in 101 Dalmatians. The polka dots signify sodomy. The rain and the umbrella are ritual sodomy symbols with rain as semen and the umbrella as both the anus (opened) and the phallus (closed). The umbrella with its scalloped edge resembles the anus (see Beta Kittens)

Cover for Art Garfunkel's album The Singer

Cover for Art Garfunkel’s album The Singer

Ricky Martin in the music video for Livin La Vida Loca

Ricky Martin in the music video for Livin’ La Vida Loca

Yasmin Le Bon, photographed by Claude Montana

Yasmin Le Bon, photographed by Claude Montana

Ray Charles Hit The Road Jack

Cover for Ray Charles’ single Hit The Road Jack

Coco Rocha, photographed by Arthur Elgort

JonBenét Ramsey; note bruise on right arm near elbow

JonBenét Ramsey at a pageant; note the bruise on her right arm near the elbow, a sign of abuse. The polka dots signify sodomy. She was murdered at six-years old, while being sexually abused by a handler/programmer

Reba McEntire Strange

Album cover for Reba McEntire’s Strange

Shabba Ranks in the music video for Mr. Loverman

Shabba Ranks in the music video for Mr. Loverman

Benny Hill

Benny Hill on The Benny Hill Show

Kardashians

Clockwise: Kylie Jenner, Kim Kardashian, Rob Kardashian, Kris Jenner, Bruce Jenner, Khloé Kardashian, Lamar Odom, Scott Disick, Kourtney Kardashian, Mason Disick and Kendall Jenner

Hayden Panettiere in Candies advertisement

Hayden Panettiere in a Candies advertisement

Alessandra Ambrosio Vogue Brazil March 2013 cover

Alessandra Ambrosio on the cover of Vogue Brazil in March 2013

 
Stef van der Laan for Numéro February 2013 Gregory Harris

Stef van der Laan in Numéro magazine’s February 2013 edition, photographed by Gregory Harris

Kel Markey Vogue Netherlands

Kel Markey, photographed for Vogue Netherlands

Jessica Lange on the cover of Vanity Fair U.S. in March 1995

Jessica Lange on the cover of Vanity Fair U.S. in March 1995

Garbage

Garbage

Hilary Rhoda and Leigh Lezark Vogue Turkey October 2010

Hilary Rhoda and Leigh Lezark on the cover of Vogue Turkey in October 2010

 Doris Day, photographed for Collier's magazine in 1952

Doris Day, photographed for Collier’s magazine in 1952

Donnie Yen covers 'Bazaar Men's Style' magazine

Donnie Yen on the cover of Bazaar Men’s Style in January 2014

Nadja Bender Numéro Magazine

Nadja Bender on the cover of Numéro magazine; double jeu is french for ‘double-dealing’

Kendall Jenner with Choupette Lagerfeld for Vogue China

Kendall Jenner and Choupette Lagerfeld, photographed for Vogue China

Sunny Griffin Vogue Pattern Book AprilMay 1967

Sunny Griffin on the cover of Vogue Pattern Book‘s April/May 1967 edition

Jim Carrey

January Jones

January Jones

Ashton Kutcher Deep magazine

Ashton Kutcher on the cover of Deep magazine

The Cars

The Cars

Julie Bowen Boston Common magazine December 2012

Julie Bowen on the cover of Boston Common magazine in December 2012

Koda Kumi - Live Tour 2011 ~Dejavu~ Audio CD Cover

Koda Kumi – Live Tour 2011 ~Dejavu~ Audio CD cover

Drew Barrymore on the cover of Fairlady magazine's October 2013 edition

Drew Barrymore on the cover of Fairlady magazine’s October 2013 edition

Muse

Muse

Christina Aguilera

Christina Aguilera

Beyoncé at 2016 MTV Video Music Awards

Beyoncé at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards

Patricia Arquette Mujerhoy magazine (Spain) November 2015

Patricia Arquette on the cover of Mujerhoy magazine (Spain) in November 2015

Padma Lakshmi

Padma Lakshmi

Luisana Lopilato, photographed for Cosmopolitan Argentina in September 2014

Kaia Gerber

Another way to symbolise duality/alter personas/demons is with a double, triple, mirror or multiple images of the same person:

Album cover for Miriam Makeba's All About Miriam

Album cover for Miriam Makeba’s All About Miriam

Oprah on the cover of O magazine. the colour purple represents magic and mystery, suggestive of shadows

Oprah on the cover of O magazine. The colour purple represents magic and mystery, suggestive of shadows, and is also the colour used to symbolise the dissociation of Monarch slaves

Album cover for Alizée's Psychédélices

Album cover for Alizée’s Psychédélices. The traffic lights symbolise: Alter Stop, Alter Start, Alter Go

Poster for the film Twin Dragons, starring Jackie Chan

Jackie Chan in Twin Dragons. Jackie is holding a violin (see The Serpent who is the Dragon)

Lindsay Lohan in The Parent Trap

Lindsay Lohan in The Parent Trap

Poster for the film Double Impact, starring Jean-Clude van Damme

Jean-Claude van Damme in the film Double Impact

Isaac Hayes ...To Be Continued

Album cover for Isaac Hayes’ …To Be Continued

Uma Thurman in an advertisement for Givenchy's Ange ou Demon perfume

Uma Thurman in an advertisement for Givenchy’s Ange ou Demon perfume

In the same advertisement, we see 'bad Uma', wearing black, and 'good Uma', wearing white; the mirror image is looking directly at Uma, symbolising that the alter persona is completely independent from the core persona

In the same advertisement, we see Uma wearing black in the mirror’s reflection and white in front of the mirror. The reflection represents the demons that possess and control Uma; black is the colour that symbolises evil. Uma is holding a finger to her lips, symbolising her inability to speak, since she is insane and spiritually bound by demons. The demons are mimicking her, symbolising how the demons that possess Monarch slaves mimic their voice and mannerisms and steal their identity

Poster for the film Big Business, starring Bette Midler and Lily Tomlin

Bette Midler and Lily Tomlin in Big Business

Cover for Faith Evan's album Something About Faith

Faith Evans on the album cover for Something About Faith

Tracy Morgan

Tracy Morgan in the television series 30 Rock. The ‘doll’ represents the demons that possess him

Peabo Bryson on the cover of the album Through The Fire

Cover for Robin Thicke's album Blurred Lines

Cover for Robin Thicke’s album Blurred Lines

Coolio Gangstas Paradise

Cover for Coolio’s album Gangstas Paradise

Cover for Nat King Cole's album Let's Face The Music!

Cover for Nat King Cole’s 1964 album Let’s Face The Music!; in the first and third pictures from the left, Nat is symbolising the ‘Eye of Ra’ (sun worship)

Telly Savalas in a Gillette Twinjector advertisement

Telly Savalas in a Gillette Twinjector advertisement

Pink in the music video for Just Like Fire

Pink in the music video for Just Like Fire

Willow Sage Hart (Pink's daughter) in Pink's music video Just Like Fire

Willow Sage Hart (Pink’s daughter) in Pink’s music video Just Like Fire; note the blue butterfly, representing the demons that possess her, and her pigtails, styled to form ears, identifying her as a spy

Album cover for Bing Crosby's His Greatest Hits of the 30s and 40s

Album cover for Bing Crosby’s His Greatest Hits of the 30s and 40s; note the sunburst

Album cover for Shakira's Oral Fixation

Album cover for Shakira’s Oral Fixation

Album cover for George Benson's The Very Best of George Benson The Greatest Hits of All

Album cover for George Benson’s The Very Best of George Benson The Greatest Hits of All

Album cover for Namie Amuro's Past<Future (Past is lesser than Future)

Album cover for Namie Amuro’s Past<Future (Past is lesser than Future); the image depicts Namie being replaced by demons

Cover for Marvin Gaye's last album In Our Lifetime?

Cover for Marvin Gaye’s last album In Our Lifetime?

Cover for Ciara's self-titled album

Cover for Ciara’s self-titled album

Jimi Hendrix photographed by Raymundo de Larrain for LIFE magazine October, 1969

Jimi Hendrix photographed by Raymundo de Larrain for LIFE magazine in October 1969

Advertisement for Madonna's perfume Truth or Dare

Advertisement for Madonna’s perfume Truth or Dare

Album cover for Eve's Scorpion

Album cover for Eve’s Scorpion

Michael Keaton in the film Multiplicity

Michael Keaton in the film Multiplicity

Amber Heard, photographed by Steven Klein for the June/July 2014 issue of W magazine. The lack of a reflection in the mirror means that we do not see the real Amber

Psy on the cover of Billboard magazine

Psy on the cover of Billboard magazine

Cover album for Keysha Cole's Calling All Hearts

Cover album for Keyshia Cole’s Calling All Hearts

Video frame from Lauryn Hill's debut single Doo Wop (That Thing)

Video frame from Lauryn Hill’s debut single Doo Wop (That Thing)

Album cover for The Billie Holiday Story

Album cover for The Billie Holiday Story

Mario for PETA

Mario for PETA

Album cover for Usher's Raymond v Raymond

Album cover for Usher’s Raymond v Raymond; note the inverted pyramid, and that Usher is symbolising both the ‘Eye of Ra’ and the ‘Eye of Horus’

Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson

Michael Jackson, photographed by Albert Watson in 1998

Michael Jackson, photographed by Albert Watson in 1998

Michael C. Hall

Mary J Blige in the video for the song Be Without You

Mary J Blige in the video for the song Be Without You

Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise in Eyes Wide Shut

Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise in Eyes Wide Shut

Dido in the music for her song Here with Me (Official Video)

Dido in the music video for her song Here with Me (Official Video)

Anthony Hopkins in Instinct

Anthony Hopkins in Instinct

Album cover for Elton John's Rocket Man: The Definitive Hits

Album cover for Elton John’s Rocket Man: The Definitive Hits

Eagle Eye Cherry in the video for his song Save Tonight

Eagle Eye Cherry in the video for his song Save Tonight

Cover for Bette Midler's album It's the Girls!

Cover for Bette Midler’s album It’s the Girls!

Cover for Rosie Ribbons' album Misbehaving

Cover for Rosie Ribbons’ album Misbehaving

Album cover for Elvis Presley's 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can't Be Wrong: Elvis' Gold Records – Volume 2

Album cover for Elvis Presley’s 50,000,000 Elvis Fans Can’t Be Wrong: Elvis’ Gold Records – Volume 2

Cover for Lionel Richie's single Just Go, featuring Akon

Cover for Lionel Richie’s single Just Go, featuring Akon

Dudley Moore – Theme From Beyond The Fringe

Album cover for Dudley Moore – Theme From Beyond The Fringe

Cover for Christopher Reeve's book Still Me

Cover for Christopher Reeve’s book Still Me

Kurt Russell

Kurt Russell

Cover for Double You's single Ain't No Stopping Us Now

William Naraine on the cover for Double You’s single Ain’t No Stopping Us Now

Karyn White

Karyn White

Album cover for F.R. David's Numbers

Album cover for F.R. David’s Numbers

Missy Elliot in Respect M.E. ( Adidas Missy Elliott Collection ) advertisement

Missy Elliott in Respect M.E. (Adidas Missy Elliott Collection) advertisement. The dogs identify her as a courier

George W. Bush on the cover of TIME magazine

George W. Bush on the cover of TIME magazine

Angela Bassett, photographed for Violet Grey magazine

Angela Bassett, photographed for Violet Grey magazine

Album cover for Red Foxx' Up Against the Wall

Redd Foxx on the album cover for Up Against the Wall

Katherine Jenkins on the cover of Fabulous magazine

Katherine Jenkins on the cover of Fabulous magazine

Cheryl Cole in the promotional advertisement for X Factor UK 2015

Cheryl Cole in the promotional advertisement for X Factor UK 2015; the light shining from her right eye signifies the ‘Eye of Ra’ (sun worship)

Venus Williams photographed for Marie Claire magazine

Venus Williams photographed for Marie Claire magazine

Album cover for Kelly Rowland's Simply Deep

Album cover for Kelly Rowland’s Simply Deep

 

Cover for Bruce Springsteen's album High Hopes

Cover for Bruce Springsteen’s album High Hopes

Whitney Houston in the music video for I’m Your Baby Tonight

David Schwimmer

Album cover for James Brown: Motherlode

Album cover for James Brown: Motherlode

Eva Green

Eric Benét Sunshine

Eric Benét on the cover for the album Sunshine

Album cover for Kelly Clarkson's Piece by Piece

Album cover for Kelly Clarkson’s Piece by Piece; Kelly is also symbolising the ‘Eye of Horus’

Beyoncé in the music video for Sweet Dreams

Beyoncé in the music video for Sweet Dreams

Heidi Klum photograohed for The Hunger magazine

Heidi Klum photographed for The Hunger magazine; note the word fragment across her face, referring to the fragmenting of her psyche/mind when she became mad during torture

Mary Jane Russell

Penélope Cruz

Penélope Cruz, photographed for the 2013 Campari calendar. The shattered mirrors signify the fragmenting of her psyche/mind when she became mad during torture

Bruce Lee & JKD Magazine

Bruce Lee on the cover of Bruce Lee & JKD Magazine (JKD ~ Jeet Kune Do); Bruce is standing on a sun, signifying sun worship

Rihanna, photographed for MAC VIva Glam 2014

Rihanna, photographed for MAC VIva Glam 2014; the green hair identifies her as an aquatic hunter

Sienna Miller photographed for Esquire magazine

Sienna Miller photographed for Esquire magazine

Dita Von Teese

Dita Von Teese

Robert Pattinson

Marion Cotillard for Lady Dior, photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Marion Cotillard for Lady Dior, photographed by Annie Leibovitz

Chitrangada Singh, photographed for Vogue India in May 2012

 Daphne Groeneveld, photographed by Txema Yeste for Harper's Bazaar Spain in April 2013; note the cross earring

Daphne Groeneveld, photographed by Txema Yeste for Harper’s Bazaar Spain in April 2013; note the cross earring

Alla Pugacheva Lubasha, A Bi

Album cover for Alla Pugacheva’s Lubasha, A Bi

Lemar Invincible

Album cover for Lemar’s Invincible

Natassa Theodoridou

Natassa Theodoridou

Nick Cannon, photographed for YRB magazine

Nick Cannon, photographed for YRB magazine

Kristen Stewart, photographed for Elle magazine

Kristen Stewart, photographed for Elle magazine

Megan Young Miss World 2013, photographed for Rogue magazine in March 2012

Megan Young, Miss World 2013, photographed for Rogue magazine in March 2012

Anna Kournikova

Lily Collins

Lily Collins

Mikky Ekko Time

Album cover for Mikky Ekko’s Time

Richard Marx Rush Street

Cover for Richard Marx’ album Rush Street

Adele

Adele

Luciano Pavarotti - The Barcelona Concert

Cover for Luciano Pavarotti The Barcelona Concert

Heath Ledger

Heath Ledger, the right side represents the demons that possessed him

Nicole Ari Parker, photographed for Denim magazine

Nicole Ari Parker, photographed for Denim magazine

Donna Mitchell by David Bailey 1970s

Donna Mitchell, photographed by David Bailey in the 1970s

Karl Lagerfeld

Karl Lagerfeld

Amber Rose, photographed for Vibe magazine

Amber Rose, photographed for Vibe magazine

Paloma Faith Only Love Can Hurt Like This

Cover for Paloma Faith’s single Only Love Can Hurt Like This

Tilda Swinton for Pomellato, photographed by Solve SundsboSølve Sundsbø

Tilda Swinton for Pomellato, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø

Naomi Campbell

Carla Bruni

Cristiano Ronaldo

Cristiano Ronaldo

Moa Aberg by Camilla Akrans for Vogue Italia March 2013 duality

Moa Aberg, photographed by Camilla Akrans for Vogue Italia in March 2013

Fred Astaire Crazy Feet

Cover for Fred Astaire’s LP Crazy Feet

Ryan Gosling Esquire September 2011

Ryan Gosling on the cover of Esquire magazine in September 2011

Angelina Jolie Vanity Fair August 2010

Angelina Jolie, photographed for Vanity Fair in August 2010

Harrison Ford Photographed by Annie Leibovitz For Vanity Fair July 1993

Harrison Ford, photographed by Annie Leibovitz for Vanity Fair in July 1993

Melodie Monrose by Sølve Sundsbø for Interview magazine

Melodie Monrose, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø for Interview magazine

Scarlett Johansson by Sølve Sundsbø

Scarlett Johansson, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø

Kristen McMenamy by Sølve Sundsbø for Vogue Italia

Kristen McMenamy, photographed by Sølve Sundsbø for Vogue Italia. The image depicts the alter personas/demons attacking Kristen, which represents demonic possession. Kristen is holding a mask, symbolising the demons that become a Monarch slave’s identity

Anjelica Huston in Zandra Rhodes, shot by David Bailey for Vogue UK, September 1971.

Anjelica Huston, photographed by David Bailey for Vogue UK in September 1971

Freddie Prinze Jr (image taken from his website)

Freddie Prinze Jr (image taken from his website)

Abbey Lee

Abbey Lee Kershaw

David Carradine on the cover of TV Guide in June 1973

David Carradine on the cover of TV Guide in June 1973

Ralph Tresvant Sensitivity

Cover for Ralph Tresvant’s album Sensitivity

Tyra Banks Harper's Bazaar Singapore

Tyra Banks, photographed for Harper’s Bazaar Singapore

Aishwarya Rai Vogue India

Aishwarya Rai, photographed for Vogue India

Samantha Fox

Samantha Fox

The Best Of Labi Siffre reverse

Cover for The Best of Labi Siffre (reverse side)

Sigrid Agren

Sigrid Agren

Rock Hudson in Seconds (1966)

Rock Hudson in Seconds (1966)

Grace Kelly

Grace Kelly

Tila Tequila

Lucky Dube in the music video for I've Got You Babe

Lucky Dube in the music video for I’ve Got You Babe

Lana Del Rey

Lana Del Rey

Patti Smith. Photo by Robert Mapplethorpe

Patti Smith, photographed by Robert Mapplethorpe for BOMB magazine

Cameron Diaz Cosmopolitan magazine

Cameron Diaz, photographed for Cosmopolitan magazine

Steve Carell in The Hollywood Reporter

Steve Carell, photographed for The Hollywood Reporter

Mary-Kate Olsen by Craig McDean Interview magazine

Mary-Kate Olsen, photographed by Craig McDean for Interview magazine

Thylane Loubry Blondeau in French Vogue

Thylane Loubry Blondeau, photographed for Vogue France

Diana Ross, photographed by Richard Avedon for French Vogue, 1970

Diana Ross, photographed by Richard Avedon for Vogue France, 1970

Christian Bale in American Psycho

Christian Bale in American Psycho

Dwayne Johnson

Dwayne Johnson

Ellen DeGeneres

Ellen DeGeneres

Bern Nadette Stanis on the cover of The Hartford Courant September 1975

Bern Nadette Stanis on the cover of The Hartford Courant on September 14, 1975

Ralph Carter Young And In Love

Album cover for Ralph Carter’s Young And In Love

Florence + the Machine Ceremonials

Album cover Florence + the Machine’s Ceremonials

Andrej Pejic, photographed for Elle Serbia; the image depicts the alter personas/demons choking Andrej, which represents demonic possession

Shirley MacLaine in My Geisha

Shirley MacLaine in My Geisha

Jackie Robinson 1955 Baseball Card

Jackie Robinson on a 1955 Baseball Card

Tatyana Ali Hello EP album

Cover for Tatyana Ali’s EP (extended play) album Hello

Faye Dunaway Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970)

Faye Dunaway in Puzzle of a Downfall Child (1970)

Tyga No Introduction

Album cover for Tyga’s No Introduction

Tanita Tikaram Dust On My Shoes (2012)

Tanita Tikaram Dust On My Shoes (2012)

Rod Stewart Body Wishes

Album cover for Rod Stewart’s Body Wishes

Will Ferrell GQ magazine

Will Ferrell on the cover of GQ magazine

Eddie Money Take Me Home Tonight

Cover for Eddie Money’s single Take Me Home Tonight

Christian Slater

Christian Slater; image taken from his website

Mel B in the music video for For Once In My Life

Madonna Give It 2 Me

Madonna in the music video for Give It 2 Me

A-ha The Singles 1984|2004

Album cover for A-ha The Singles 1984|2004

Celia Hammond, Vogue June 1967

Celia Hammond on the cover of Vogue magazine in June 1967

CeCe Winans self-titled album

Cover for CeCe Winans’ self-titled album

Evangeline Lily

Evangeline Lilly

Living The Dream A Tribute To Martin Luther King Jr.

Album cover for Living The Dream A Tribute To Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by Various Artists

Amanda Holden

Amanda Holden

R. Kelly on The Single Ladies Tour poster

R. Kelly on The Single Ladies Tour poster

Aaliyah Try Again video

Aaliyah in the music video for Try Again, wearing a slave collar and chains — symbols of her enslavement

Dave Grohl on the cover of Billboard magazine

Dave Grohl on the cover of Billboard magazine in September 2013

Eddie Murphy in the Nutty Professor

Eddie Murphy in The Nutty Professor

Barry White Can't Get Enough

Album cover for Barry White’s Can’t Get Enough

Busta Rhymes Back On My B.S.

Cover for Busta Rhymes’ album Back On My B.S.

Tamara Dey album The First Lady And The Boys

Album cover for Tamara Dey’s The First Lady And The Boys

Michelle Branch

Michelle Branch

Elaine Irwin and Tatjana Patitz Vogue Paris July 1990

Elaine Irwin and Tatjana Patitz as mirror images of each other, photographed by Bruce Weber for Vogue Paris in July 1990

Bonnie Tyler in the music video for Total Eclipse of the Heart

Bonnie Tyler in the music video for Total Eclipse of the Heart

Linda Gray on the cover of Los Angeles magazine

Linda Gray on the cover of Los Angeles magazine

Richard Gere in American Gigolo

Richard Gere in American Gigolo; also below:

richard-gere-in-american-gigolo-mirror

Arnold Schwarzenegger Muscle & Fitness magazine [United States] (July 2007)

Arnold Schwarzenegger on the cover of Muscle & Fitness magazine [United States] in July 2007

Gregory Isaacs on the cover of the album Willow Tree

Leonardo DiCaprio as King Louis XIV and his twin Philippe in The Man in the Iron Mask. His twin represents the demons that possess him and control him; note the cross on the iron mask in the position of the third eye

Then we have sunglasses; eyes are the windows to the soul, so the message is we don’t see the person, who has been replaced by demons:

Kevin Costner on the poster for the film Revenge

Leonardo DiCaprio in The Aviator

Leonardo DiCaprio in The Aviator

Tevin Campbell - Can We Talk single

Tevin Campbell on the cover for the single Can We Talk

Morgan Freeman in Oblivion

Morgan Freeman in Oblivion

Ray J - Gifts

Cover for Ray J’s single Gifts

Lady Gaga on the cover of The Observer Magazine